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OCT
14
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Family Affairs - Is It Wise To Treat Family?

Is It Wise To Treat Family?

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3007 Hits
JAN
27
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Referral Letters

Writing Referrals by

Writing referral letters

The Definitive Guide To

Writing Referral Letters

By

@DentistGoneBadd

 

 

Basic Referral Writing

Let’s start with the essentials. Referral letters should contain the basics; name, sex (if any – I don’t like to ask really), date of birth and reason for returning….oh sorry, that’s sending a parcel back to Amazon. Long gone are the days of “Please see and treat,” so try and give the specialist you are referring to, a bit of a clue as to the reason for your referral. Throw in a couple of vague differential diagnoses if you can, just to demonstrate you aren’t completely gormless, with proper medical terms like ‘epidermolysis bullosa’ or ‘squishy lump.’ It’s probably best not to refer a patient just because you don’t like the look of them, tempting though it is.

Writing referral letters

Choice of Specialist

If you are worried about a lump, it’s best to send to a consultant lumpologist. But beware, some specialisms do cross over and consultants can get a bit elbowy and will fight over interesting lesions. I once witnessed a near fist-fight between an oral medic and an oral surgery registrar – both convinced they could write a paper about it. Every time, make sure you are referring to the most appropriate department. One department will treat a lesion with a spray and ineffective mouthwash, while another will cut it out and put an implant in its place.

 

Oral Surgery Referrals

Oral surgery referrals are probably the most common type made. It’s not quite clear why this should be. Fewer dentists get into trouble over oral surgery than perio neglect or root-treatments. I think that oral surgery is probably all a bit too gooey for a lot of dentals and the anticipation of complications is overthought. Because oral surgery departments are absolutely swamped, you have to make a convincing case. Warfarin patients are no longer a bar to treatment in practice, so throw in ‘difficult access’ and ‘a history of difficult extractions’ for good measure. ‘Proximity to the antrum’ doesn’t often wash. Since many oral surgery departments insist on you supplying a supporting radiograph, they can justifiably throw out the referral and tell you where to stick your jpeg when they realise it’s a lower molar you are talking about.

Writing referral letters

Orthodontic Referrals

These are probably a little more clear-cut, if you completely ignore IOTN, which I did. I doubt very much if it’s done now, but the acronym ‘FLK’ (Funny Looking Kid) in the margins of the old paper files, acted as a reminder to refer to the orthodontist once the overcrowding started to hurt your aesthetic sensibilities. I find FLK’s generally DO get orthodontic treatment, so providing they are reasonably competent with toothbrushing, and generally look as if they’re using the hairy end, send that referral. Again, don’t just ask to ‘see and treat’. Throw in ‘well-motivated,’ ‘optimal oral hygiene’ and ‘very stroppy mother’ to emphasise the need for action. Chuck in a couple of measurements if you can, and try and crowbar in a stab at a ‘division’ to show to the orthodontist you’ve given it some careful consideration.

Writing referral letters

Periodontal Referrals

This type of referral is usually done in panic five minutes after you have just unexpectedly lost a BPE probe down a previously scoring ‘1,’ so do try and keep the panic out of your letter. Make it sound like you’ve been closely monitoring things for a considerable period of time and really emphasise that when you first saw the patient, most of the damage was already done. ‘Despite my oral hygiene instruction’ also shows that you have been caring, but don’t get too down about having to refer and being condemned by the periodontist. The specialist will probably only see the patient for twenty minutes max anyway, and will never see them again, immediately throwing the patient into the ‘Pit of Hygienists.’

Writing referral letters

Endodontic Referrals

Endodontic referrals are becoming incredibly popular and you are highly unlikely to get one rejected, since they are often made to private specialists. Don’t bother trying to refer to your local dental hospital. The sun will have died well before your patient gets to the top of the list. Besides, dental hospital endodontists are exceptionally picky about what they treat. My local dental hospital won’t treat any tooth beyond a first molar. They aren’t that clear why, though I suspect it’s because trying to get to a seven is a bit ‘too fiddly.’ Failure in endodontics is a growing area of litigation and if you are an NHS dentist in particular, don’t risk ANY root-treatment – refer. You can throw a lot of information into your referral letter – sclerosis, unusual anatomy or “There’s a prominent squiddly-do on my radiograph” – but it doesn’t matter. These are endodontists. They have to pay for swanky microscopes and German Sportwagen. They’ll accept anything.

magnification

 

Implant Referrals

See Endodontic Referrals. Patients think they are the same thing anyway.

 

Prosthetics Referrals

Tricky. Prosthetics specialists are a dying species. Their natural habitat in the 60’s and 70’s was gummy, but since forestation with teeth, the need for them has diminished. The few prosthetists left, tend to pack together at dental schools, desperately attempting to procure close relationships with implantologists, borne out of their innate instinct to survive. Having said all that, I have had more referrals rejected by prosthetics specialists than any other type. To be absolutely honest with you, whatever you say in your referral to a denture specialist, they’ll write back with “We would recommend extending the flanges and see no reason why this cannot be carried out in practice. Now leave me alone. I need to bury my nuts for the winter.” Good luck.

Writing referral letters

Community Clinic/Paediatric Referrals

This is where you send all of your ‘challenging’ patients, or those that take an hour to do an enamel-only incisal edge composite on. Terms you should include in your letter are ‘wriggly,’ ‘anxious,’ ‘fearful,’ ‘phobic’ and ‘gagger,’ though be careful you don’t end up making it sound like a Facebook advert for happy hour at the local S&M Club. Make it absolutely clear that this patient needs sedation. Forget about suggesting GA. The clinicians at these emporia don’t stop talking about the risk of death from the time the patient enters the place having found it after previously mistakenly walking into the adjacent STD Clinic. If your local clinics have their own referral forms and it gives you the option to have the patient back if they refuse sedation, tick ‘NO!!!’

Writing referral letters

Restorative Specialist Referrals

 

Quite a few restorative specialists lurk in dental schools, but despite this, they try not to have anything to do with teeth. There is only one important, indeed, CRITICAL sentence you need to include in your referral letter, and that is: “I am ALREADY monitoring the diet and wear.”

 

Oral Medicine Department Referrals

 

You will normally refer to the oral medicine specialists as a means of backing up your diagnosis, which is almost certainly, atypical facial pain/burning mouth syndrome. Often, you would save a lot of time by giving a nightguard or benzydamine hydrochloride rather than wasting your time on a referral letter.

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JAN
14
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Pointless?

Pointless

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OCT
22
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Breaking Bad News

Breaking Bad News

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JAN
28
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Enhanced CPD by @DentistGoneBadd

Enhanced CPD

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JUL
20
0

Sparkling Resuts!

Sparkling Resuts!

 

 

NSK proudly supports numerous educational courses across the UK and Ireland, including the Perio with Deepak events.

Perio with Deepak aims to equip professionals with the skills and knowledge required to offer patients the most effective periodontal therapy. These courses enable dental professionals to understand and manage periodontal conditions through a combination of prevention, maintenance and treatment methods.

The most popular course is the 3-day Masterclass in Periodontal Disease Treatment and Management. Designed for dentists, dental therapists and hygienists, this course covers three phases:

  • Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy – providing delegates with a comprehensive knowledge of periodontal disease management using non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) within a primary setting;
  • Treating and Maintaining Periodontal Disease – a hands-on day teaching planning and managing periodontal treatment after non-surgical procedures, focussing on ultrasonic scaling and air polishing.
  • Implementing Ideas and Profitable Periodontics – exploring the rationale behind evidence-based procedures, care pathways, better patient care and ethical selling of periodontal treatment.

During the course all delegates have the opportunity to use the latest NSK Varios 970 iPiezo ultrasonic scaler. With a range of over 70 tips, the Varios 970 is the ideal choice for perio, endo and scaling treatment or where minimal intervention is required.

Remaining events for 2017:

London 4-6 Aug 2017

London 18-20 Aug 2017

Nuneaton15-17 Sept 2017

Look online for full course content, aims & objectives, start/finish times, venue details etc. http://www.periowithdeepak.com/courses/master-class/

For more information on NSK’s scaling devices, visit www.mynskoralhygiene.co.uk or contact NSK on 0800 634 1909.

www.nsk-uk.com

www.mynsk.co.uk

Twitter: @NSK_UK

 

Facebook: NSK UK Ltd

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2171 Hits
JAN
08
0

Going Rogue

Going Rogue

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5899 Hits
MAR
13
0

Key opinion leaders reach consensus on periodontal health

Key opinion leaders reach consensus on periodontal health

In April 2015, a group of key opinion leaders met with a team from Johnson & Johnson at a National Advisory Panel event in Dublin to advise on the topic of ‘Improving the periodontal health of Irish population – prevention and treatment’.

At the meeting, the key opinion leaders agreed on the following periodontal health consensus statement:

• ‘Effective plaque and calculus removal is key to oral health;

• Dental healthcare professionals have a responsibility to educate patients on their disease status and to direct patients appropriately;

• Patients should receive tailored oral hygiene instruction and demonstration;

• Patients have a responsibility to act upon the advice given by dental healthcare professionals;

• For effective management optimal patient home care and professional debridement are both essential;

• Long-term periodontal maintenance with continuity of care is critical for successful treatment outcome;

•Clinically proven mouthwashes, gels and pastes should be considered for recommendation to those individuals who are not achieving optimal levels of plaque control in their home care routine.’

 

The key opinion leaders were:

 
• Professor Finbarr Allen, Professor of Prosthodontics and Oral Rehabilitation at University College Cork;
 
• Professor Noel Claffey, Professor of Periodontology at Dublin School of Dental Science
 
• Professor Anthony Roberts, Professor of Restorative Dentistry (Periodontology) at Cork University Dental School and Hospital;
 
• Dr Rory Maguire, Principal of Clarendon Periodontics and Implant Dentistry in Dublin;
 
• Dr Mark Condon, Principal of the Leeson Dental Clinic in Dublin, specialising in Restorative (Prosthodontics) and Implant Dentistry; and
 
• Ms Louise Fleming RDH, President of the Irish Dental Hygienists Association.
 
Johnson & Johnson looks forward to using this consensus statement as it continues to work in partnership with dental professionals alongside the Advanced Defence range.

 
 
For further information, please contact Johnson & Johnson Ltd on 1800 220044.
 

 

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2470 Hits
FEB
09

Better dentistry

Better dentistry

Dr Amit Patel is a registered specialist in periodontics; graduating in 1997 from the University of Liverpool, he is now the principal of the Birmingham Dental Specialists as well as working as the Associate Specialist in Periodontics and Honorary Clinical Lecturer at the University of Birmingham dental school. He is a prolific lecturer both nationally and internationally and is enthusiastic about practising better dentistry. To this end, Amit always ensures to use the best equipment possible to achieve excellent results.
 

“Everything I use is A-dec,” says Amit. “I have an A-dec 500 dental chair, an A-dec LED light and, after trialling one recently, I’m using the A-dec 500 stool as well. Together, these pieces of equipment allow me to practise better dentistry – not just for my patients, but for myself as well.
 

“Many dentists will suffer from back pain and musculoskeletal disorders throughout their careers. The positions we must assume to perform even the simplest of dental treatments can have a real effect on our wellbeing – indeed, the majority of dentists who are forced to retire early, do so because of these debilitating conditions.
 

“But modern, ergonomic equipment, like that supplied by A-dec, can have a huge impact on the ease with which we can practise dentistry and the quality of life we can enjoy as a result. For example, the 500 stool allows me to assume a comfortable posture in which I can remain for long periods of time; even during implant surgery I do not get fatigued. What’s more, because the stool is so lightweight and easily manoeuvred, I can move around my patient without having to stretch.
 

“Similarly, a good light will help eliminate eye strain. Repeatedly focussing in and out of the oral cavity and having to adjust to the different ambient lights can cause unnecessary strain. The A-dec LED light I use is bright enough to negate this: it illuminates everything. I find it particularly useful since I perform a significant amount of surgery and I need a light bright enough to fulfil my needs. Rather than investing in an incredibly expensive theatre light, the A-dec LED is more than satisfactory. It’s also incredibly light and easily manoeuvred, making it applicable for many indications. Some of my patients comment on just how bright is – but they appreciate that the better I can see, the better the result of their treatment will be.
 

“I also work with the University of Birmingham Dental School and use A-dec equipment there as well. As a way of promoting good posture and ergonomic practice, A-dec products are the best.
 

“I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend A-dec and its products to any dentist.”
 

With an eclectic range of dental equipment that has been specifically made with dental professionals in mind, A-dec will provide you with everything you need to practise better, healthier dentistry.
 

To find out the benefits yourself, contact the friendly team today.

 

For more information about A-dec Dental UK Ltd, call 02476 350 901 or visit: www.a-dec.co.uk

   

  2429 Hits
2429 Hits
FEB
09

Oral Health Hazards for Hospital Patients

Oral Health Hazards for Hospital Patients

It has been known for centuries that dental health and systemic health are linked. However within the challenging environment of a hospital, oral care is still, quite often a low priority. Recent studies reveal that total bacterial count of dental plaque increases during hospitalisation[1] and the oral cavity of hospitalised patients can harbour high frequencies of bacterial respiratory pathogens.[2] As a result, this can lead to infections and hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP)2.
 

As well as inadequate oral hygiene, the potential risks to oral disease and discomfort in hospitalised patients include a significant number of medications as well as artificial feeding and high-calorie food supplements used to maintain nutrition. In addition, the effects of nasal oxygen, mouth breathing, intermittent suction of the airway and the restriction of oral food and fluid all contribute to a decrease in saliva production and symptoms such as xerostomia.[3]
 

Another common problem for sick patients is the dry mouth and discomfort caused by constant open mouth posture that is required for intubation. For those undergoing surgery, there can also be further complications. A study involving 404 surgical patients under general anaesthesia facilitated by endotracheal intubation, revealed that 6.9% sustained various degrees of oral trauma including soft tissue laceration, tooth fracture, prosthesis damage, tooth avulsion, ecchymosis and numbness of tongue.[4] In addition, a recently published study on the oral health of 162 patients found an increase in plaque levels and deterioration of gingival health during just a short stay in hospital.[5]
 

If a patient that has recently been hospitalised attends the dental practice, practitioners may observe oral tissue and tooth trauma, high plaque levels, gingivitis and periodontal disease. As always, it is fundamentally important to reinforce oral health instructions and to treat any dental problems efficiently. If, for example, periodontal disease has developed, it is first necessary to remove and disrupt the plaque using root surface debridement (RSD). In cases with deep periodontal pockets it is usually necessary to implement an adjunctive therapy to inhibit further periodontopathic bacterial growth and allow the periodontium time to heal and stabilise. Some practitioners use antibiotics for this purpose, but, if the patient has recently been unwell and had antibiotics prescribed previously, the risks of resistance are greater and it is preferable to use an antimicrobial alternative.
 

Practitioners should therefore consider PerioChip® – a wafer thin dental insert that is an effective, non-antibiotic alternative for treating periodontal pockets over 5mm. PerioChip® is applied directly into the periodontal pocket and slowly releases chlorhexidine digluconate to eliminate 99% of bacteria over 7-10 days.[6] Furthermore, the insert employs a controlled-release system and continues to provide an antibacterial effect to suppress bacterial growth for up to 11 weeks after placement.[7]

 

As it seems that care for medical and dental problems are still less coordinated than we might expect, it is imperative to emphasise to patients that successful recovery after a period of ill health or hospitalisation is not just about the body but also their oral health.

 

PerioChip® is available exclusively from Dexcel Dental, to order or for further information call 0800 013 2333 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 


[1] Sachdev MReady D, et al. Changes in dental plaque following hospitalisation in a critical care unit: an observational study. Crit Care. 2013 Sep 4;17(5):R189. doi: 10.1186/cc12878.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24007571 [Accessed 1st September 2015]

3 David ZuanazziaRenata Soutoa, et al. Prevalence of potential bacterial respiratory pathogens in the oral cavity of hospitalised individuals. Archives of Oral Biology Volume 55, Issue 1, January 2010. doi:10.1016/j.archoralbio.2009.10.005 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003996909002581 [Accessed 1st September 2015]

[3] Janet Griffiths and Debbie Lewis. Guidelines for the oral care of patients who are dependent, dysphagic or critically ill. Journal of Disability and Oral Health (2002) 3/1 30-33.  http://www.shancocksltd.co.uk/download.php?op=view_article&article_id=57 [Accessed 1st September 2015]

[4] Fung BKChan MY. Incidence of oral tissue trauma after the administration of general anesthesia. Acta Anaesthesiol Sin. 2001 Dec;39(4):163-7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11840582 [Accessed 1st September 2015

[5] Lucas L. A. Sousa, Wagner L. S. E. Silva Filho, et al. Oral health of patients under short hospitalization period: observational study. Journal of Clinical Periodontology 2014; 41: 558–563. doi:10.1111/jcpe.12250. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcpe.12250/abstract [Accessed 1st September 2015]

[6] Jeffcoat M K et al. Adjunctive use of a subgingival controlled-release chlorhexidine chip. J Periodontal 1998; 69 (9): 989 – 997. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9776027 [Accessed 1st September 2015]

 

  4186 Hits
4186 Hits
JAN
14

Florida Probe - Single Operator Accuracy and Efficiency

b2ap3_thumbnail_Discover-more-with-Clark-Dental.jpg

For a complete electronic probing and charting system that allows a single operator to complete a comprehensive periodontal exam in under ten minutes, turn to the Florida Probe from Clark Dental.

The Florida Probe handpiece exerts a constant force regardless of the strength or pressure of the operator, which guarantees accuracy and reproducibility between users.

Alternatively, the new VoiceWorks microphone and headset system can be used to capture the same data into the same software.

Using either system means there is no need to have another member of staff present to record the results. 

The Florida Probe aids patient communication by providing a detailed periodontal chart that can be used to create a “treatment map” for scaling and root planing, subgingival antimicrobials or laser treatment. When combined with the patient diagnosis sheet, this becomes an invaluable clinical and legal record of informed consent to protect your practice.

To explore the benefits of utilising the Florida Probe, contact Clark Dental’s team of experts who will be pleased to demonstrate and offer advice about the Florida Probe System and the new Voice Works system.

 

For more information call Clark Dental on 01268 733 146, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit www.clarkdental.co.uk

  2601 Hits
2601 Hits
JAN
12

Health and Financial Costs of Antibiotic Resistance

Health and Financial Costs of Antibiotic Resistance

In May 2015, the World Health Assembly endorsed a global action plan to tackle antimicrobial resistance, including antibiotic resistance, the most urgent drug resistant trend.

 

The World Health Organisation (WHO) defines antibiotic resistance as “resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial drug that was originally effective for treatment of infections caused by it.1” They go on further to say it is a “natural phenomenon” and that the misuse and overuse of the medication accelerates this worldwide problem. The effect of this “ticking time bomb” is felt across the health of the global population and worldwide healthcare budgets.

 

The meeting in May created five strategic objectives to tackle the issue including increasing awareness and understanding, reducing the incidence of infection and developing the economic case for sustainable investment2. A survey carried out by the WHO a month earlier found that of 133 participating countries, only 34 had a comprehensive national plan to fight resistance to antibiotics. It discussed how management of the situation was paramount but due to inadequate laboratory capacity, infrastructure and data management practice, trends and outbreaks were poorly detected and monitored. Importantly, many countries had no stringent guidelines on the prescription of antibiotics, which could result in overuse and misuse by prescribers.

 

Excess Expenditure

There is not only the effect this issue has on the health of the global population, but also the impact it has on a country’s economy. Drug-resistant infections could kill an extra 10 million people across the world every year by 2050 if they are not treated successfully. By this date they could also cost the world around $100 trillion in lost output2. Health expenditure in most countries is rising steeply already and resistance to antibiotics is going to contribute significantly in the near future. Excess costs associated with the resistance are due to longer hospitalisation, delayed therapy, higher morbidity rates, the necessity for surgery and the need to use more expensive antibiotics3.

 

Jim O’Neill, an economist leading a review into antimicrobial resistance for the UK government, estimated that $37 billion is needed over the next 10 years to spur the pharmaceutical industry into developing innovations in this troublesome segment. He went on further to say that this was a “modest sum” compared to the cost of not doing anything. During the 1990’s, pharmaceutical companies withdrew from investing in this kind of research due to a high uncertainty around what the final market potential would be, and still the pipeline does not look particularly robust. Also, antibiotics work so fast and so well that they provide relatively weak returns for high investment. Companies prefer to channel their funds towards the treatment of chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, as drug treatment for this type of disease will be taken for longer periods of time; usually for the rest of the patient’s life.

 

Prevention Strategies

This naturally occurring threat is not going to be eradicated without preventative measures being implemented globally. In one research paper on the subject, Sipahi suggests that the following strategies should be followed:

-       Optimal use of existing antimicrobial agents

-       Where possible, use alternative therapies

-       Increase immunity

-       Educate healthcare professionals

-       Regulations and policies

-       Stringent infection control protocols3.

 

There are scientists working to develop new drugs able to combat bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics. One of the more recent discoveries reported in The Guardian earlier this year has been hailed as a “game changer” and is called teixobactin. It can kill a wide range of bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Teixobactin works by blocking the capacity of resistant bacteria to build cell walls, therefore making it almost impossible for bacteria to develop resistance4. It is, of course, still early days.

 

Alternatives to Antibiotics

The alternative is to use drugs and therapies that do not contain antibiotics, yet are as effective in the results that they deliver. PerioChip® is a non-antibiotic solution and can therefore be used in the longer term. It is designed for use in conjunction with traditional treatment to suppress bacterial flora in periodontal pockets of 5mm or more. It contains 2.5 mg of Chlorhexidine Digluconate and is recommended for first line treatment of periodontal pocketing. Results from clinical studies show a pocket reduction of more than 2mm in almost three quarters of patients when placed every three months5.

 

Antibiotic resistance is a looming problem that all governments and healthcare professionals around the world need to take responsibility for. With alternatives to antibiotics available that can be used in dental treatment plans, dental practitioners need to carefully consider what they prescribe and ensure they are doing what they can.

 

To order PerioChip® or for further information Freephone 0800 013 2333 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

Summary of product link;

http://www.old.health.gov.il/units/pharmacy/trufot/alonim/PerioChip_dr_1337488974840.pdf

 

Abbreviated Prescribing Information

PerioChip® 2.5mg Dental Insert (Chlorhexidine digluconate)

For full prescribing information, including side effects, precautions and contraindications, see Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC).

Presentation: Dental insert: bullet shaped orange brown containing Chlorhexidine digluconate 2.5mg.

Indications: PerioChip® is an adjunctive antimicrobial treatment for moderate to severe chronic periodontal disease in adults with pocketing, combined with Root Surface Debridement (RSD). Not indicated in children and adolescents.

Dosage and Administration: One PerioChip® is inserted into a periodontal pocket with a probing pocket depth of ?5mm. Retreatment with PerioChip® following mechanical plaque removal at 3 month intervals may provide additional benefit if pocket depth remains ?5mm. For details see SmPC. Removal is unnecessary as PerioChip® biodegrades.

Contraindications: Hypersensitivity to Chlorhexidine digluconate or excipients.

Precautions: Allergic reactions have occurred but are rare.

Interactions: Avoid nystatin: antagonistic of Chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine is incompatible with anionic agents present in some toothpastes and with dietary sucrose, but there is no significant impact on the efficacy of PerioChip®.

Undesirable effects: During the first few days after insertion, transient pain or discomfort of gums or teeth; redness and/or swelling of the gums.

Overdose: Not reported

Pregnancy/ Lactation: Controlled studies in pregnant women have not been conducted, so weigh expected benefits against possible foetal risks: caution in nursing mothers (see SmPC).

NHS list price: £207.20

Legal category: P, Product Licence Number: PL 14017/0035

MA holder: Full prescribing information is available on request from Dexcel Pharma Ltd, 7 Sopwith Way, Drayton Fields Industrial Estate, Daventry, Northants, NN11 8PB.

Adverse events should be reported. Reporting forms and information can be found at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.

Adverse events should also be reported to:

Dexcel Pharma Ltd on 01748 828784

 

1. Fact Sheet No194, WHO

2. http://amr-review.org

3. Sipahi OR. Economics of antibiotic resistance. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2008 Aug;6(4):523-39. doi: 10.1586/14787210.6.4.523.

4. The Guardian, 7th January 2015

5. Soslkolne W.A et al. Probing depth changes following 2 years of periodontal maintenance therapy including adjunctive controlled-release of chlorhexidine. JOP 2003;74:420-427

  3128 Hits
3128 Hits
DEC
01

The John Zamet Memorial Prize in Periodontal Research

The John Zamet Memorial Prize in Periodontal Research

The John Zamet Memorial Prize has been established to recognise and commemorate the significant contribution made to clinical periodontology by the late Dr John Zamet.
 

Dr Zamet was an Honorary Consultant and Senior Research Fellow at the UCL Eastman Dental Institute, a Past President and Honorary Member of the British Society of Periodontology and the founder Chairman and a Trustee of the Alpha Omega London Chapter and Charitable Trust.

Applications are open to all UK-based postgraduate dental students studying for a Masters degree or PhD who are undertaking or who have recently completed original research associated with clinical periodontology.

The prize will be awarded every other year with a value of £2,000.

Applicants should submit a covering letter and an abstract not exceeding 1000 words which should, at least, cover the following areas:

1. Background to project?
2. Aims
?3. Methods?
4. Relevance to clinical periodontology
?5. Start and completion dates (estimated completion date will suffice if ongoing)

Three paper copies of the application should be submitted by 31st December 2015 to:

Professor Andrew Eder?Chairman, The Alpha Omega London Charitable Trust 2nd floor, 57a Wimpole Street, London W1G 8YP

And also sent electronically via email to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.?. The applicant must also submit a letter of support from their research supervisor confirming their supervision of the project. The submission will be considered by a panel of at least two Specialists in Periodontology of Professorial/Consultant status whose decision is final.

 

The successful applicant would normally be invited to present the results and/or clinical implications of the research at a meeting of the Alpha Omega London Chapter.

  2387 Hits
2387 Hits
NOV
05

Periodontal disease: more than an oral health concern

Periodontal disease: more than an oral health concern

Described as a global burden, severe periodontitis has been reported to be the sixth most prevalent medical condition in the world.[1]

 

In the UK, periodontitis affects about half of all adults with up to 15% estimated to have the condition severely.[2] These shocking statistics echo the findings of the 2009 Adult Dental Health Survey, which reported that, although this generation has a better outlook than their predecessors, there are still many people whose oral health and function does not meet the best possible standards.[3]

 

Periodontal disease is a particular area of concern because it can cause serious oral health problems and when left untreated, and can result in tooth loss as well as deterioration of both gingiva and bone. Ominously the potential effects and implications of periodontal disease may also extend beyond oral health and recent research has established that periodontal infection is a probable risk factor for various systemic diseases, including pulmonary disease.[4]

 

Furthermore, periodontal disease has the capability of changing the chemical composition of the blood and glucose levels as well as interfering with the body's inflammatory system and thereby increasing the risk of diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis,[5] respiratory[6] and cardiovascular diseases.[7],[8]

 

As we know, tobacco use, stress and obesity may be significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease. However people with other general health conditions also have an increased risk of developing the condition. Evidence has consistently revealed that diabetes is a risk factor for the prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis[9] and a five-year follow-up, population-based study in Taiwan[10] has also indicated that patients with osteoporosis might have an increased chance of developing periodontitis.

 

Over the last few decades the concept of a genetic vulnerability to periodontal disease has also been investigated.[1] Since the completion of the Human Genome Project (HGP)[2], researchers have found evidence to suggest that a key element of whether individuals develop periodontitis appears to be controlled by the way they interact with environmental agents including biofilm. These researchers also believe that periodontal disease could be categorised more effectively using pathobiology-based grouping as well as the clinical presentation of the disease, rather than the current clinical only classifications of ‘chronic’ and ‘aggressive’.[3]

 

A new system for categorising periodontitis based on the molecular profiling of gingival tissues has therefore been devised, which could enable earlier diagnosis and more personalised treatment. It is hoped that patients found to be highly susceptible to severe periodontitis may be considered for assertive therapy even if that person only show indicators. This would then prevent aggressive progression, bone and tooth loss.

 

Helping patients to understand the threat of periodontal disease not only with regard to oral health but also in relation to other potential health risks is vital. Of course treatment for periodontal disease depends upon each individual case, but every patient must appreciate the importance of practicing good oral hygiene. Employing an improved oral health care regime may be enough to kerb further development of the disease in some patients, although professional scaling and debridement is commonly required to remove plaque, calculus and biofilm from the teeth and roots.

 

For some patients it is necessary to include on-going periodontal therapy with medication to keep infection under control and to heal periodontal pockets. Nevertheless, in aggressive cases it may be necessary to perform flap surgery to clean the area thoroughly and suture periodontal pockets. Some of these patients may also require bone grafting to promote new growth or tissue regeneration to cover any exposed tooth roots.

 

In many cases a general dentist, therapist or hygienist can treat patients with periodontal disease successfully. However, in complex or unresponsive cases the skills of a specialist periodontist may be needed. By creating a good working relationship with a reliable referral practice, such as London Smile Clinic, your patients can benefit from specialist clinical skills in a wide spectrum of dentistry. With a wealth of experience in oral and maxillo-facial surgery, Dr. Hatem Algraffee, specialist periodontist at London Smile Clinic

 


[1] N.J. Kassebaum, E. Bernabé, M. Dahiya, B. Bhandari, C.J.L. Murray, W. Marcenes.  Global Burden of Untreated Caries: A Systematic Review and Metaregression J DENT RES, May 2015; vol. 94, 5: pp. 650-658, first published on March 4, 2015

[3] 2009 Adult Dental Health Survey (ADHS) http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB01086/adul-dent-heal-surv-summ-them-exec-2009-rep2.pdf

[4] Scannapieco FA, Papandonatos GD, Dunford RG. Associations between oral conditions and respiratory disease in a national sample survey population. Ann Periodontol 1998;3:251-256.

[5] American Academy of Periodontology. http://www.perio.org/consumer/risk-factors

[6] Association between respiratory disease in hospitalized patients and periodontal disease: a cross-sectional study. Sharma, N., Shamsuddin, H. J. Periodontol. August 2011. pp1155-1160. Available at: http://www.pharmaden.net/pdf/articles/2.pdf

[7] Machado AC, Quirino MR, Nascimento LF. Relation between chronic periodontal disease and plasmatic levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and fractions. Brazilian oral research, 2005, 19(4):284–9.

[8] Genco RJ et al. Overview of risk factors for periodontal disease and implications for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Compendium of continuing education in dentistry, 2001, 22(2 Spec. No.):21–3.

[9] Mealey BL, Oates TW. Diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases. J Periodontol. 2006;77:1289-1303.

[10] Population-Based 5-Year Follow-Up Study in Taiwan of Osteoporosis and Risk of Periodontitis
Wei-Pin Chang, Wei-Chiao Chang, Mei-Shin Wu, Jei-Tsung Pai, Yuh-Cherng Guo Ku-Chung Chen, Mu-En Liu, Wen-Ta Chiu, and Kuo-Sheng Hung

4 Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. Informational paper: implications of genetic technology for the management of periodontal diseases. J Periodontol. 2005 May;76(5):850-7.   

5 Schafer AS, Jepsen S, Loos BG. Periodontal genetics: a decade of genetic association studies mandates better study designs. J Clin Periodontol. 2011 Feb;38(2):103-7.

[2] National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), National Institute of Health US. www.genome.gov

[3] Gingival Tissue Transcriptomes Identify Phenotypically Distinct Classes of Periodontitis. Panos N, Papapanou M, Kebschull R.T, Demmer B, Grün  P, Guarnieri P, Pavlidis P (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada) March 2014. http://jdr.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/03/17/0022034514527288  [Accessed 25th March 2015] 

 

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3582 Hits
NOV
04

Acteon and EuroPerio8

Acteon and EuroPerio8

EuroPerio8, the triennial world leading conference in periodontology, made its visit to London this year.

With lectures held throughout the duration of the conference, EuroPerio Platinum Sponsor, Acteon, presented lectures on Thursday and Saturday.

On Thursday, Dr Amit Patel and Donna Schembri explored the concept of ‘Seeing the Unseen’ - Utilising Fluorescent Technology for Optimal Periodontal Care.

The theme from Acteon and the two speakers was clear: improve patient understanding to empower self-care and utilise technology to see better and treat faster.

Cutting-edge products mentioned as examples for the effective removal of plaque included the Newtron P5xs ultrasonic generator, the Air n Go easy airpolisher and Soprocare - which utilises state of the art photonics technologies.

It was a similar story from the Ziv Mazor lecture on Minimal Invasive Surgery Utilizing Piezo Surgical Device - Optimizing Biological and Functional Outcome in the Posterior Maxilla.

Using products such as Piezotome® and Sinus Lift Kit as examples, he articulated that innovative technology minimises complications, reduces treatment and healing time, and ultimately enhances function.

Improve patient understanding and encourage them to look after themselves by giving them the tools and the knowledge: together we can improve patient care.

Find out more about innovations available from Acteon by calling the team today.

For more information on Acteon and how to educate your patients, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., call 01603 227019 or visit www.acteongroup.com

  2870 Hits
2870 Hits
AUG
16
0

PerioChip® experts at the BDIA Dental Showcase 2015

PerioChip® experts at the BDIA Dental Showcase 2015

The on-stand experts will be at this year’s BDIA Dental Showcase 2015, showing delegates why PerioChip® is a first line treatment for periodontal disease.

 

PerioChip® provides unique adjunctive treatment for periodontitis. After root surface debridement (RSD), PerioChip® is a reliable product to supplement your hard work by controlling bacteria and preventing infection without using antibiotics.

Designed for treating periodontal pockets >5mm, PerioChip® takes only 30 seconds to apply. Once placed, the chip immediately releases a high local concentration of chlorhexidine diglucontate, killing 99% of subgingival pathogenic bacteria over a seven to ten day period.[i] For further peace of mind the antimicrobial effects of PerioChip® continue to suppress bacterial flora for up to 11 weeks enabling the periodontium to stabilise and heal.[ii]

The BDIA Showcase is ideal opportunity to have a practical hands-on demonstration from the PerioChip® team and grab some valuable information to help your patients. Come and see us on stand D115.

 

To order PerioChip® or for further information Freephone 0800 013 2333 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 


[i] Jeffcoat M K et al. Adjunctive use of a subgingival controlled-release chlorhexidine chip. J Periodontal 1998; 69 (9): 989 – 997. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9776027 [Accessed 26th May 2015]

[ii] Summary of Characteristics PerioChip® http://www.old.health.gov.il/units/pharmacy/trufot/alonim/PerioChip_dr_1337488974840.pdf [Accessed 26 May 2015]

 

  5395 Hits
5395 Hits
AUG
06

Innovation, Inspiration and Knowledge

Innovation, Inspiration and Knowledge

Nobel Biocare sponsored two sessions at this year’s EuroPerio8, presenting outstanding speaker line-ups and updates on the very latest advancements in the field.

 

On Thursday, Christer Dahlin, Iñaki Gamborena and Eric Rompen presented to a capacity crowd on ‘Hard and soft tissue parameters to support optimal aesthetics – innovative approach to materials and techniques’.

They discussed everything from the challenges of biological mechanisms to the benefits of healing abutments and the evidence supporting biocompatible materials currently on the market. Key innovations mentioned included the Angulated Screw Channel (ASC) abutment, PEEK healing abutments and the new NobelActive® Wide Platform and NobelParellel® Conical Connection implant systems.

On Friday, leading international clinicians Chadur Wadhwani and Stefan Holst joined Eric Rompen to consider ‘Multi-causality of peri-implanitis – Give the bone the chance to survive’. This session explored aetiology of complex chronic infections like peri-implantitis and demonstrated factors that can facilitate bone healing.

The crowded lecture theatre was packed full of enthusiastic delegates keen to learn from some of the best in the business and advance their own skills. Inspiration and innovation were clearly abundant and a great event was enjoyed by all.

To discover more about the cutting-edge products available from Nobel Biocare and the benefits they offer your implant patients, contact the team today.

 

For more information, contact Nobel Biocare on 0208 756 3300, or visit www.nobelbiocare.com

  2969 Hits
2969 Hits
JUL
21

Transform your dentistry with Carl Zeiss magnification systems | Nuview Ltd

Transform your dentistry with Carl Zeiss magnification systems | Nuview Ltd

Mr Matthew Garnett is a specialist Periodontist and Prosthodontist and works as a Consultant in Restorative Dentistry at Newcastle Dental Hospital; he uses Carl Zeiss EyeMag Pro F loupes with a Feather Light LED and is delighted with the enhanced visualisation they provide.

 

“Having routinely utilised loupes for in excess of 10 years, I have been well aware of the visual and postural benefits that can be achieved; however that being said, I have recently invested in the EyeMag Pro F loupes, and the optical clarity of the prismatic lenses and greater magnification is outstanding and has far surpassed my expectations. I have greater vision with a clear and wide field of view and excellent illumination is offered by way of the Feather light LED. All of these features facilitate the way I undertake all of my periodontal plastic surgery in addition to my general operative dentistry.

“There is no reason not to use the loupes, the weight is compatible with comfort and you can use them all day and not feel any added pressure. As well as this, the charge on the battery for the Feather Light is more than sufficient for a full days clinical work.”

Carl Zeiss magnification systems are exclusively available in the UK from Nuview, contact the team today to see how your daily practice could benefit from the enhanced visualisation on offer.

For more information please call Nuview on 01453 872266,

email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit www.nuview.co

  2966 Hits
2966 Hits
JUL
16

Innovation, Inspiration and Knowledge - Nobel Biocare Sponsored Sessions at EuroPerio8

Innovation, Inspiration and Knowledge Nobel Biocare

Innovation, inspiration and knowledge are key elements for the advancement and maintenance of a practitioner’s skills in dental implantology. At EuroPerio8, practitioners had the chance to hear from those at the very forefront of the profession in sessions sponsored by Nobel Biocare.


On Thursday, an outstanding line-up of leading speakers including Christer Dahlin, Iñaki Gamborena and Eric Rompen presented to a capacity crowd on ‘Hard and soft tissue parameters to support optimal aesthetics – innovative approach to materials and techniques’.

Dr Christer Dahil, Professor in Oral Surgery and Guided Tissue regeneration at the Department of Biomaerials Science, Institute for Clinical Sciences in Sweden, was the first to take to the podium. He explored the biological mechanisms that present challenges for the implant clinician, highlighting the importance of guided bone regeneration and discussing the various bone defect classifications.

Dr Iñaki Gamborena, Associate Professor at the University of Washington Dental School, was keen to highlight the importance of the soft tissue, encouraging minimally invasive techniques by exposing as little bone as possible during procedures. Favouring a graftless approach, he considered the benefits of healing abutments to improve the condition of the soft tissue before conventional abutments are placed.

Finally, Professor and Head of the Department of Periodontology / Dental Surgery at the University of Liège in Belgium, Dr Eric Rompen looked further at the interface between the soft tissue and implant. Discussing the properties and clinical evidence supporting biocompatible materials, he used case studies to demonstrate the adhesion process and warn how easily detachable the soft tissue is even when using these materials.

Throughout the inspirational session, cutting-edge products from Nobel Biocare were described which are designed specifically to enhance the clinical outcome of implant treatment. These included the Angulated Screw Channel (ASC) abutment, increasing workflow flexibility and access; PEEK healing abutments, optimising the emergence profile; and the new NobelActive® Wide Platform and NobelParellel® Conical Connection implant systems, ideal for the posterior region.

Nobel Biocare also sponsored a session on the Friday, with leading international clinicians Chadur Wadhwani, Stefan Holst and Eric Rompen once again. Entitled ‘Multi-causality of peri-implanitis – Give the bone the chance to survive’, this session explored aetiology of complex chronic infections like peri-implantitis and demonstrated factors that can facilitate bone healing.

 

For more information, contact Nobel Biocare on 0208 756 3300, or visit www.nobelbiocare.com

 

  2934 Hits
2934 Hits
JUL
14

BSDHT: decidedly European!

BSDHT-decidedly-European.jpg

Europerio8 was attended by 9400 delegates and the BSDHT was honoured to be co-hosting this prestigious event. The official opening ceremony was an opportunity for the 29 member  societies to come together and celebrate the start of an exciting and innovating three days of research, dialogue and discussion held in London for the first time.

These congresses, held every three years, aim to implement the EFP vision of "Periodontal health for a better life". BSDHT President Michaela ONeill, addressing delegates from the stage said:

"On behalf of the British Society of Dental Hygiene and Therapy, I would like to thank the European Federation of Periodontology and the British Society of Periodontology for what promises to be a very stimulating and productive few days.

My role, and the role of my fellow dental hygienists and therapists, is one part of a vast chain of dentistry that leads to good oral health.

We’re constantly trying to translate our research into patient friendly messages.

The recent results of the European Workshop in Periodontology have focussed new light on how we thought we should educate our patients – especially as it included what looks now like a one hundred and eighty degree turn in the new recommendation for interdental brushing rather than flossing.

But beyond conference, and indeed academia, it is crucial that we are "people facing"   and that we can filter the messages of a major conference like this directly to our clinical staff: they are the gatekeepers who will present your messages direct to our patients.

And on behalf of the BSDHT, we are proud that the importance of our role within periodontology is being reflected at EuroPerio 8."

 

Follow the BSDHT on Twitter @BSDHTUK or further information about BSDHT

Tel:     01788 575050  |  Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  |  Web:   www.bsdht.org.uk

Address:  Smile House, 2 East Union Street, Rugby, Warwickshire, CV22 6AJ

  2996 Hits
2996 Hits
JUL
13

Technology and education: Improving patient care - Dr Amit Patel and Donna Schembri

Technology and education: Improving patient care

Speaking at EuroPerio8 on Thursday June 4th, Dr Amit Patel and Donna Schembri explored the concept of ‘Seeing the Unseen’ - Utilising Fluorescent Technology for Optimal Periodontal Care.

 

With the two speakers covering the subjects of diagnosis, communication and the treatment of periodontal disease and peri-implantitis, the message was clear: innovation changes products and progress changes behaviours.

 

Studies have shown that 40 - 80% of information is forgotten immediately by patients[i]. Donna therefore noted that if you want your patients to be better informed about periodontal disease, you need to find better ways to enhance their understanding. By replacing dental jargon with emotive wording and replacing negative and daunting connotations of treatment with positivity, this has the potential to empower and motivate your patients - increasing your chance of success and improving overall patient care.

 

With comfort and increased effectiveness at the forefront of innovation, Donna and Amit firmly believe that by using the right technology and products you can minimise the presence of plaque on teeth and dental implants: achieving the ultimate goal of tooth loss prevention.

 

Using photos and videos for examples, the fluorescence protocol was put to the test with demonstrations of how pioneering products can be utilised to treat and maintain periodontal disease effectively. Both speakers also highlighted the need for

continued focus on educating patients about the differences between supragingival cleaning, subgingival cleaning, root planning, use of medication and x-ray and follow up treatment. They need to be informed of the benefits of prophylaxis as well; those being tartar removal, aesthetics and fresher breath.

 

Examples of cutting-edge products mentioned included Acteon’s Newtron P5xs ultrasonic generator, the Air n Go easy airpolisher and the Soprocare - which utilises state of the art photonics technologies. With products like these, patients can reap the benefits of accurate detection, quick visual follow up, comfort, oral hygiene education and complete removal of plaque and stains with minimally invasive treatment.

 

As the question and answering session post lecture depicted, the main concerns highlighted among professionals included patient’s lack of understanding. “It is a relationship,” Dr Amit Patel explained, “Give them the tools to do it themselves and lead them in the right direction.”

 

It would seem then that the answer to better patient care is twofold: improve patient understanding and rapport to empower patients to look after themselves and utilise technology to see better and treat faster.

 

On Saturday June 6th, Ziv Mazor examined the concept of Minimal Invasive Surgery Utilizing Piezo Surgical Device - Optimizing Biological and Functional Outcome in the Posterior Maxilla, once again sponsored by Acteon.

 

In order to explore invasive surgery, Mazor first identified potential obstacles that can occur during treatment.

 

He noted that implant placement in the atrophic posterior maxilla often causes complications due to the quality and volume of the bone that is available. With the height and width of the residual ridge being affected by post-extraction resorption patterns, physical trauma, periodontal disease and pneumatisation of the sinus, he highlighted that longer and wider implants are needed to enhance long-term survival.

 

Research points towards infected sockets being the most common cause of post-extraction complications, with a study showing a percentage of 48.7. Bleeding sockets came second with 41% and retained roots caused 10.3% of problems[ii].

Recent innovation in this area highlights that trauma to the tissues and the underling bone can be eliminated, minimising both the procedure time and post-operative complications.

 

With sinus lifts and osteotome techniques often being associated with higher morbidity rates and complication risks, technological advances are a revelation in achieving a reduced risk and high standard of patient care.

 

Mazor went on to suggest that with the use of reliable, powerful and simple products such as Piezotome® ultrasonic surgery unit from Acteon, there are fewer complications and emphasis can be instead placed on the application of autologous growth factors. By utilising the sinus lift balloon technique, patients can also benefit from the reduction of risk to damage of the Schneiderian membrane. An example of this product is the Sinus Lift Kit by Acteon, which offers the practitioner a straightforward and safe answer to the sinus lift operation.

 

The point of this lecture was clear: in reducing complications with the aid of innovative technology, ultimate function of patient dentition can be reached in a shorter time period and risk-free way.

 

Thus there is a noticeable change in the direction of periodontology. The products that are being developed are innovative and effective not just because of what they can do for professionals, but also for how they engage and empower the patient.

 

For more information on products available email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., call 01603 227019 or visit www.acteongroup.com

 



[i] Patient’s memory for medical information. Journal Of The Royal Society Of Medicine. Roy PC Kessels. May 2003; 96 (5): 219-222.

Accessed 5th May 2015 on www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmc539473/

[ii] Post-extraction complications seen at a referral dental clinic in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. International Dental Journal. Volume 51, Issue 4, Pages 273-276, August 2001. Elison Simon and Dr. Mecky Matee. Article accessed online on June 5th 2015. Onlinelibrary.wiley.com.doi.10.1002/j.1875-595x.2001.tb00837.x/abstract.

 

  3765 Hits
3765 Hits
JUL
13

PerioChip® delight at EuroPerio 8

PerioChip delight at EuroPerio 8

Proud partner of the British Society of Periodontology (BSP), PerioChip® was among the Gold Sponsors of EuroPerio 8 and delighted delegates with an array of first class speakers and educational content.

Prior to the exhibition, the professional team looked forward to extolling the advantages of PerioChip®. EuroPerio 8 was a fantastic place for PerioChip® to raise awareness amongst the dental community about gum disease and its potential links to systemic illnesses such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

The speakers taking to the stage at the show included: Professor Eli Machtei, Professor Arie J Van Winkelhoff and Dr Rajan Nansi.

Professor Machtei of the Rambam School of Dentistry in Israel is Clinical Associate Professor at the Faculty of Medicine at the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel). His session, Guided Tissue Regeneration: When to use it, focused on periodontal regeneration and looked at how far the profession has progressed and what future research is needed in order to improve our clinical outcomes. He asked what the limitations are, and where should dentists complete or refrain from completing guided tissue regeneration.

Professor Arie J Van Winklehoff of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands is Co-owner of Laboral Diagnostics en Laboral International, a service in the field of clinical microbiology for dental professionals. His session, When should we use systemic antimicrobials? discussed the rationale behind using these drugs in treating periodontitis. It considered the recent World Health Organisation recommendations surrounding the over-prescription of antimicrobial medicines and encouraged a more evidence-based approach to the prescription of antibiotics for periodontitis.

Dr Rajan Nansi, Chair of Early Careers Group, BSP UK also spoke at the event and his session, Management of periodontitis in practice: Practical concepts, aimed to discuss the effectiveness of non-surgical periodontal therapy and explore the use of adjunctive locally applied antimicrobials in periodontal treatment.

Delegates at EuroPerio 8 could see that PerioChip® is passionate about supporting, educating and communicating with the dental community to highlight the importance of keeping gums healthy, and treating gum disease effectively without the risk associated with using antibiotics.

This is where the advantages of this wafer thin biodegradable insert really come into their own. By using PerioChip® you can ensure that harmful bacteria are eliminated for up to 10 days[i] and, for on-going therapy, PerioChip® suppresses the growth of bacterial flora in the treated site for up to 11 weeks, giving the all-important time needed for gum reattachment and stabilisation of the periodontium[ii].

If you missed out on attending EuroPerio 8 and want to learn more about PerioChip® email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 0800 013 2333 today!


 


 

Summary of product link;

http://www.old.health.gov.il/units/pharmacy/trufot/alonim/PerioChip_dr_1337488974840.pdf

 

Abbreviated Prescribing Information

PerioChip® 2.5mg Dental Insert (Chlorhexidine digluconate)

For full prescribing information, including side effects, precautions and contraindications, see Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC).

Presentation: Dental insert: bullet shaped orange brown containing Chlorhexidine digluconate 2.5mg.

Indications: PerioChip® is an adjunctive antimicrobial treatment for moderate to severe chronic periodontal disease in adults with pocketing, combined with Root Surface Debridement (RSD). Not indicated in children and adolescents.

Dosage and Administration: One PerioChip® is inserted into a periodontal pocket with a probing pocket depth of ?5mm. Retreatment with PerioChip® following mechanical plaque removal at 3 month intervals may provide additional benefit if pocket depth remains ?5mm. For details see SmPC. Removal is unnecessary as PerioChip® biodegrades.

Contraindications: Hypersensitivity to Chlorhexidine digluconate or excipients.

Precautions: Allergic reactions have occurred but are rare.

Interactions: Avoid nystatin: antagonistic of Chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine is incompatible with anionic agents present in some toothpastes and with dietary sucrose, but there is no significant impact on the efficacy of PerioChip®.

Undesirable effects: During the first few days after insertion, transient pain or discomfort of gums or teeth; redness and/or swelling of the gums.

Overdose: Not reported

Pregnancy/ Lactation: Controlled studies in pregnant women have not been conducted, so weigh expected benefits against possible foetal risks: caution in nursing mothers (see SmPC).

NHS list price: £207.20

Legal category: P, Product Licence Number: PL 14017/0035

MA holder: Full prescribing information is available on request from Dexcel Pharma Ltd, 7 Sopwith Way, Drayton Fields Industrial Estate, Daventry, Northants, NN11 8PB.

Adverse events should be reported. Reporting forms and information can be found at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.

Adverse events should also be reported to:

Dexcel Pharma Ltd on 01748 828784

 


[i] Jeffcoat M K et al. Adjunctive use of a subgingival controlled-release chlorhexidine chip. J Periodontal 1998; 69 (9): 989 – 997. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9776027 [Accessed 26th May 2015]

[ii] Summary of Characteristics PerioChip® http://www.old.health.gov.il/units/pharmacy/trufot/alonim/PerioChip_dr_1337488974840.pdf [Accessed 26 May 2015]

 

  5438 Hits
5438 Hits
JUN
15

Delegates discover the benefits of PerioChip® at EuroPerio 8

Delegates discover the benefits of PerioChip® at EuroPerio 8

Delegates at EuroPerio 8 could see first hand that PerioChip® is passionate about supporting, educating and communicating with the dental community to highlight the importance of keeping gums healthy, and treating periodontitis effectively without the risk associated with using antibiotics.
 

By using PerioChip® you can ensure that harmful bacteria in and around the gingiva are eliminated for up to 10 daysi and, for on-going therapy, PerioChip® suppresses the growth of bacterial flora in the treated site for up to 11 weeks, giving the all-important time needed for gum reattachment and stabilisation of the periodontiumii.
 

EuroPerio 8 was a fantastic venue for PerioChip® to raise awareness amongst the dental community about gum disease the links to systemic illnesses such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The speakers taking to the stage at the show to share their knowledge included: Professor Eli Machtei, Professor Arie J Van Winkelhoff and Dr Rajan Nansi, and attendees were wowed by their passion and expertise for the subject.
 

If you missed out on attending EuroPerio 8 and want to learn more about PerioChip® email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 0800 013 2333 today!
 

i Jeffcoat M K et al. Adjunctive use of a subgingival controlled-release chlorhexidine chip. J Periodontal 1998; 69 (9): 989 – 997. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9776027 [Accessed 26th May 2015]

ii Summary of Characteristics PerioChip® http://www.old.health.gov.il/units/pharmacy/trufot/alonim/PerioChip_dr_1337488974840.pdf [Accessed 26 May 2015]

 

  4840 Hits
4840 Hits

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