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DEC
17
0

The TRUE Dental meaning of Christmas by @DentistGoneBadd

The TRUE Dental meaning of Christmas

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5846 Hits
MAR
05
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Dental Occupational Health Risks

Occupational health

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6015 Hits
MAY
08
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Halitosis

Halitosis - Its not to be sniffed at.

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7466 Hits
DEC
02

12 top tips for the 12 days of Christmas

 

12 top tips for the 12 days of Christmas

According to charity Addaction, 54% of men and 41% of women are expected to drink over the recommended guidelines at Christmas, and so it is important to raise our patients’ awareness of the increased potential for tooth damage at this time of year.

As we dental professionals know all too well, alcohol is acidic and therefore highly erosive, especially when consumed frequently, in large quantities over an extended period of time. It may also be that the high alcohol intake occasionally causes vomiting, which can exacerbate the damage to the dentition.

To help prevent tooth wear, advise patients to:

1. Drink still water or low fat milk between meals

2. Limit fruit juice to once per day

3. Avoid carbonated drinks

4. Swallow any acidic drinks immediately to reduce contact time with the teeth

5. Use a wide-bore straw to drink acidic drinks to limit the contact time with the teeth

6. Dilute and keep any acidic drinks chilled, as this reduces the damaging low pH potential

7. Rinse the mouth after acidic foods and drinks with water for 15-30 seconds to dilute any remaining acids

8. Snack on cheese or drink some milk following consumption of an acidic beverage

9. Wait at least an hour to brush teeth after consuming any acidic drinks

10. Use a toothpaste that is fluoridated to 1400ppm and low in abrasivity

12. Use a fluoridated mouthwash every day at a different time to tooth brushing, as well as before or after acidic drinks to help limit the erosive potential

12. Chew sugar-free gum, especially that containing xylitol, after drink to help neutralise the acidic environment in the mouth.

 

If you are concerned that any of your patients are showing signs tooth wear, simply visit www.toothwear.co.uk, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 020 7486 7180.

 

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2700 Hits
JUN
01
0

Do your patients know that alcohol and oral health don’t mix?

London Tooth Wear Centre - Dental Health and Alcohol

With barbecues getting stoked up for summer, it may be a good time to help raise awareness among patients that their alcoholic drink of choice accompanying their chargrilled chicken may contribute to tooth wear.

Patients need to know that alcohol is acidic and therefore highly erosive, especially when consumed frequently, in large quantities over an extended period of time. It may also be that the high alcohol intake occasionally causes vomiting, which will exacerbate the damage to the dentition.

It’s also worth sharing with them that carbonated drinks, including sugar-free varieties, will have a similar effect on their dentition.

As well as coronal height being reduced, patients may also suffer with hypersensitivity due to the wear. In such cases, using a fluoridated mouthrinse every day at a different time to toothbrushing is an effective first line of defence. A desensitising toothpaste and/or prescription fluoride toothpaste can be helpful in alleviating sensitivity, while use of a calcium phosphate paste, applied in carriers, is an additional option if the symptoms are severe. Also, placing protective covering restorations can eliminate sensitivity and minimise further wear.

Further advice includes:

• Guiding the patient in brushing effectively yet gently with a relatively soft toothbrush and a toothpaste low in abrasivity

• Not swishing drinks around the mouth and waiting an hour after consuming an acidic drink before brushing to avoid damaging the softened enamel

• Rinsing the mouth with fluoride mouthwash or water before or after acidic drink consumption to help limit their erosive potential

• Chewing sugar-free, xylitol- or sorbitol-sweetened gum to help neutralise acid in the mouth.

 

The London Tooth Wear Centre® offers an evidence-based and comprehensive approach to managing tooth wear. To request advice, make a referral or for further information on the work of the London Tooth Wear Centre®, please visit www.toothwear.co.uk, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 020 7486 7180.

 

  3067 Hits
3067 Hits

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