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FEB
05
0

The Tale of a Dental Tyrant by @DentistGoneBadd

Safe air and fury

  5828 Hits
5828 Hits
DEC
15
0

Dentex Celebrate First Year of Success

Dentex Celebrate First Year of Success

 

 

The 8th November marked just one year since dental partnership group, Dentex, secured its first dental practice, and what a year it’s been. The first twelve months of any business is meant to be the hardest, but in this time Dentex has accumulated 17 practices as part of the group, with a further 18 in due diligence; and secured £21m in funding. Not bad for an organisation that began with just six members of staff.

Since its inception, Dentex has almost taken on a life of its own. Driven by Barry Lanesman, CEO, Pat Langley as Chief Dental Officer and Rob Paxman as Director of Partnering, all of whom have long-term experience within the dentistry field, the organisation has sought – and succeeded – to fulfil a very great need in the dental industry: enabling dentists to share in the value created through a dental collective.

They differ from typical dental corporates by offering much better long-term wealth creation opportunities to their partners. Dentists are able to extract equity from their practice, but continue to stay involved and benefit from the growth whilst preserving their clinical independence. Dentex provides support to dentists as partners, enabling growth without removing a practice’s autonomy; so, dentists continue to run their practice, expanding and thriving, no longer having to constantly focus on cash flow and financials.

In a year that has seen the group awarded the ‘Highly Commended Award for Innovation of the Year’, as well as finalists for ‘Product Launch of the Year’ – Dentex has found success in a model that challenges the traditional dental corporate pattern. There is no management takeover, no rebranding, as happens when joining a corporate franchise; partners maintain their autonomy, gaining input and assistance only where they require it. This allows practices to retain their individuality, which is important for practitioners and patients alike. And with two partnership models – Regional and Practice – it’s possible for Dentex partners to either reduce their responsibilities or enhance them, either focusing on their core interests at a local level to ensure a premium patient experience is delivered, or building a portfolio of surgeries in order to broaden their potential remit. Once approved and passed through the stringent Dentex criteria for partner selection, the choice of how they wish to proceed is left to the individual member.

There is an acute focus on finding the right partners. Integrity, respect for each other and highest ethical standards are just a few of the values that make up Dentex’s foundations, and all members of the group are expected to share this ethos.

Dentex is not about running a business model that’s dictatorial, it’s about helping dentists work together. Dentists often face similar challenges, so partners are encouraged to build and grow in a collegiate way.

Barry Lanesman, Dentex CEO, comments:

‘With a five-year plan which aims to see the Group at 150 partnering practices by 2022, it’s still early days for Dentex, but so far, the company is very much on track, thanks to its unique offering. This time last year there was a gap in the market. Dentex have filled it admirably.

But while the organisation’s phenomenal growth is certainly worth marking, Dentex’s driving force is quality over quantity. Each Dentex partner wants to share growth and remain involved in the development of the practice, not exit at the earliest opportunity. They are genuinely enthused and motivated about clinical dentistry and use their partnership with Dentex to help overcome regulatory, compliance and administrative barriers.

The partnership allows them to focus on areas of dentistry they’re truly passionate about. Each one of the partners excels in their field with an unswerving commitment to deliver premium patient care, sharing best practice for the common good of the group – and ultimately the patient.’

Dentex has shown significant growth thanks to its unique offering. They have ambitious growth expectations and so far, are on track to hit their target of 150 practices by 2022.

Dentex Regional Partner, Bhavna Doshi of Perfect Smile dental studios, explains why she joined the group. ‘Dentex is a partner that has allowed us to preserve our ethos and way of business, and provide a collaboration of mastermind. We have been able to keep our business identity, leadership philosophy, quality of dentistry and exceptional patient care. At the same time, they have given us the financial and business support to grow our group of practices.’

Andrew Birrell, Executive Director of Universal Partners, Dentex’s largest investor said ‘The Dentex message continues to resonate with clinicians who wish to release equity whilst retaining upside, and continue to enjoy the clinical freedom to deliver for their patients before joining the group. The company is performing ahead of our expectations and we look forward to seeing it prosper in future”

Further information on Dentex here.

  2266 Hits
2266 Hits
FEB
20
0

Room 101

Room 101

  5648 Hits
5648 Hits
JAN
20
0

Rodericks Dental Brings Eye Care Back Into Healthcare

Rodericks Dental Brings Eye Care Back Into Healthcare

 

 

 

Dedicated to providing excellent patient care and dental treatment, Rodericks Dental is extending its services to bring eye care back into the healthcare setting.

 

It seems that too often these days, a visit to the opticians puts more emphasis on retail than healthcare. A trip to the opticians can feel more like shopping than tending to important eye conditions.

 

Rodericks is looking to change this by providing a combined healthcare solution for their valued dental patients that focuses more on their healthcare needs and giving advice on how to take care of their eyes.

 

The first Rodericks Dental Eye Care successful service was opened more than year ago from Buckingham House Dental Practice, with second following last year in Luton House Dental and Eye Care. Providing the same patient-centred care the group has become known for in dentistry, Rodericks is excited to watch the service develop and open more eye care services in the coming months.

 

Rodericks Dental – proud to be the corporate with a difference.

 

For more information please visit www.rodericksdental.co.uk

  2794 Hits
2794 Hits
NOV
17
0

Career development opportunities and support

Career development opportunities and support

 

 

Sarah Weston (pictured above) has been working for {my}dentist – a member of the Association of the Dental Groups (ADG) – since 2013 and currently works in Woodbridge, Suffolk. Here, she explores what a normal day entails…

 

I qualified from Guy’s hospital in 1996 and have worked in Australia, New Zealand and the UK. I have worked across most sectors of the profession – as a house officer in New Zealand, in NHS and private practices and as a partner and an associate.

 

At my current practice in Woodbridge, we are predominately NHS in a small market town, but do offer a range of private services. With an interesting demographic of patients we get the chance to utilise all our skills. It is a busy practice as we routinely see 25-30 patients a day. I am lucky that I work with a really great team and most of us have worked together for a while now. It’s good to be with other people who understand the stress and strains of the job and can have a good laugh together at times.

 

I work full time so my days tend to be fairly similar. I start with a coffee then move on to checking day-lists, patient records and lab work etc. I hate surprises so I like to know what’s coming. I spend my day performing a mix of examinations and treatments with the odd interesting case thrown in.

 

I also offer facial aesthetic procedures and have recently been on the denture excellence course. It is great to be able to offer such a wide choice of treatment options to patients and the denture excellence has really taken off. It’s an area I really enjoy as a good denture can make so much difference to someone’s quality of life. I am hoping to undertake an implant restoration course soon as well, so I will be able to restore the implants placed by colleagues at local practices in the group.

 

Since working for the corporate I have also become a mentor, which has definitely been a highlight for me. It is a role I really enjoy, as after 20 years in the job it is nice to pass on some of my experience to the younger generation. I had a great VT instructor when I started and I hope I can be as good to new associates as he was to me. It’s a job that is mutually beneficial – it is extremely rewarding to see a mentee improve and gain in confidence and it does the same for the mentor.

 

Within the corporate we are so lucky to have a high level of support from practice and area managers through to clinical support managers (CSM) and clinical directors. They are there to help prevent small problems becoming larger ones. I know that the ‘red flags’ and KPIs can feel intrusive at times, but I do feel they are there to help clinicians above everything else. A visit from the CSM should be seen as a positive thing and I am lucky to have a great CSM in my area. One thing I have learned is that it can be lonely in the independent sector and there is no-one looking out for you in the same way. I think the support network available is the real strength of corporate dentistry.

 

We are also incredibly lucky to have the online academy and the reminder to complete CPD when it is required. This can be a burden for dentists and if there is any way to make it easier then we should be grateful! My practice manager keeps us in check with when our CPD is due and the opportunity to complete it online is a great help, especially when I am busy in practice five days a week. Overall, I feel that my move to {my}dentist was the best thing I could have done for my career. The opportunities are there to further my career in ways that I didn’t feel existed in the independent sector.

 

Having worked for most of my career in the independent sector I was aware of the negative press surrounding corporate dentistry before I joined the group, but I have to say that those rumours were all unfounded. In fact, I feel quite passionately that new graduates are still being given that negative message and as a company we should try to give the next generation the facts and talk to them directly.

 

I enjoy my job enormously but I would relish the chance to move out of the surgery environment a little in the coming years. I would like to expand on my mentoring role and continue with more training and support of new dentists and I hope I can achieve this within the company.

 

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk

 

  1929 Hits
1929 Hits
NOV
08
0

A Day in the Life of a Clinical Lead

A Day in the Life of a Clinical Lead

 

Dr Mark Hughes is a Clinical Lead for Bupa Dental, which is a member of the Association of Dental Groups. Here, he discusses how his daily life has changed since joining the corporate…

 

 

It has been just over two years since Bupa Dental acquired our group of practices. I was previously a partner in the business, based in the City, West End and Canary Wharf. Our focus was primarily corporate dental clients, with an emphasis on dental insurance schemes alongside private patients. 

 

I took on the role of Clinical Lead for the group, while also caring for a full patient list. Having been involved from 1998 to 2014, I had become very busy with regular and new clients covering all aspects of general dental care. In addition, I was liaising with the other dentists, dental nurses and hygienists regularly to identify any issues. We prided ourselves on responding to clinical and personal concerns quickly, despite the increasing size of the group.

 

When we announced the change of ownership, there were varied concerns from both the clinical and administrative staff. I suppose we all have an image of a faceless, financially driven, uncaring business when the word ‘corporate’ is linked with dental practice, so there was a degree of scepticism to manage. As there had been a long consultation process prior to the sale, however, we were convinced that the new group shared our goals and beliefs in how to care for patients and move the business forward. As such, we were pleased to find these concerns did not come to fruition.

 

I was offered the role of Clinical Lead within Bupa alongside my usual clinical duties. This has involved being a part of the clinical governance process including audits, interviewing new clinicians, complaint handling and acting as a link between practitioners and management. I was keen to undertake this role to facilitate the transition between private and corporate ownership, as well as helping the continuity of patient care.

 

Which brings me to the main question many will ask – what is it like working as part of a large organisation?

 

First the caveats; I came from a relatively large group practice where, whilst clinical autonomy was valued, there was a sense of team and shared attitudes to patient care. We had a very low turnover of staff and encouraged meetings and communication in what we hoped was a relaxed working environment.

Also the experience we had joining the corporate were, it goes without saying, unique to our situation and the attitudes and approach of the management team.

 

I hope that I can comment from a relatively impartial standpoint despite being pro-takeover from the outset. In addition, part of what I can report comes from the opinions expressed to me from other staff members after 18 months of new ownership.

 

So what has changed? On a day-to-day basis, very little. Bupa Dental has great belief in clinical freedom while remaining aligned with mainstream dental thinking. This extends to a very broad, though not limitless, choice of materials, along with keeping individual dentists’ favoured laboratories open to them. In fact, when the practices meet for CPD evenings, exploring new techniques and materials is actively encouraged. This is not to say that the commercial aspects of the dental business are overlooked, rather that the importance of high clinical standards is a priority. This leads to another plus of operating within a larger group; the depth of clinical experience available across the whole spectrum of general and specialist dentistry. The ability to send an email out across such a large number of dentists asking for opinions cannot be underestimated. What’s more, a larger corporate can market and promote its services, skills and individual practices to a much wider audience than could be achieved by a single practice.

 

I think some of the benefits of working for a large organisation depend on your perspective – for example, a practice owner will drastically reduce their paperwork by selling to a corporate and becoming an associate. In my experience, other members of the team have reported seeing little difference in their administrative responsibilities, or indeed a slight increase in line with the corporate’s emphasis on self audit and appraisal. Whether this is symptomatic of working for a large organisation, or merely representative of the increasing governance faced by all clinical staff, is debatable ­– similarly, some people appreciate the email reminders and others find them intrusive!

 

Ultimately, the fact that the practice I work in is owned by a corporate has made little impact to the way I approach my clinical day – I have retained my clinical freedom and responsibility to patients. However it’s great to know that I have the support of a larger healthcare company backing me up so I can focus on being a dentist.

 

To find out more about the ADG and member groups, please visit http://www.dentalgroups.co.uk

 

NB: The views expressed in this and similar columns by individual ADG members are intended to stimulate constructive debate about current issues in dentistry. Thoughts are the authors’ own and not necessarily those of the ADG.

  3385 Hits
3385 Hits
OCT
31
1

How The Other Half Live

How the other half lives

  6939 Hits
Recent comment in this post
Graham John Nichols

This is so true

An amusing blog except it is so true. I also work for a corporate and recognise the scenarios. I wonder how they get away with it.... Read More
Sunday, 06 November 2016 07:42
6939 Hits
OCT
09
0

Christie + Co sells Jordan Dental

Christie + Co sells Jordan Dental

In one of the largest transactions of the year to date, specialist dental adviser Christie + Co has sold six dental practices based in the East Midlands operating as Jordan Dental.

Jordan Dental is a progressive and well run group of predominantly NHS practices in excellent locations in Nottingham, Derby and Mansfield. The portfolio has been sold to {my}dentist, the largest corporate operator in the UK. The price was undisclosed.

Acting for the Jordan family, Christie + Co undertook a confidential marketing process from which {my}dentist was chosen as the preferred bidder. Clare Emery, Senior Associate at specialist solicitors Harrison Clark Rickerbys acted for the vendors.

Simon Hughes, Director and Head of Medical at Christie + Co comments: “I am delighted that Christie + Co was chosen to act for Dave Jordan in the sale of his business. He took advantage of strong market conditions and we were able to agree and conclude terms much more quickly than can often be the case with NHS practice sales. We wish {my}dentist the very best with their acquisition which gives them a significant and quality presence in the Nottingham dental sector.”

Dave Jordan of Jordan Dental comments: "It was a pleasure working with Christie & Co, the team showed great understanding of our needs and guided us through the difficult decision to sell something that we had worked so hard to build from scratch. I wish the team at {my}dentist every success in the future and trust that the group will continue to flourish as part of a much bigger operation."

Robert Pilling, Director of Acquisitions at {my}dentist adds: “I am delighted with the acquisition of the Jordan Dental Group and look forward to working with the practice teams over the coming months and year ahead. I would also like to extend my thanks to the Jordan family on choosing to sell to {my}dentist and also to the Christie + Co team who supported the acquisition process in a very professional manner.”

 

 

 

  3367 Hits
3367 Hits

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