The GDPUK.com Blog

All that's new in the world of dentistry
FEB
08
0

Campaign for skills mix to continue throughout 2018

Campaign for skills mix to continue throughout 2018
 
 

As part of its dedication to helping corporate and dental group providers deliver quality treatment outcomes, the Association of Dental Groups (ADG) works closely with the government, regulators and NHS to improve the use of skills mix. 

 
The greater and more flexible use of skills mix could help to improve patient care, streamline workflow and assist with workforce supply issues as a result of Brexit. Despite the clear benefits, there is still a lot of work to be done around the wider implementation of skills mix, and while the future of the contract reform remains unclear so will this aspect of dentistry. 
 
Throughout 2018, the ADG will continue its campaign on behalf of and in collaboration with member corporates and groups, to ensure that optimal outcomes are achieved. 
 
For the latest developments in skills mix, be sure to follow the work of the ADG.  
 
For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk
 
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1321 Hits
JAN
20
0

Help is always given to those that need it

Help is always given to those that need it

 

 

In the field of dentistry, dentists may sometimes experience stress at work – after all, it can be a very fast moving, performance-driven environment.

As such, dentists (just like everyone else) are at risk of developing a substance abuse problem such as an alcohol or smoking addiction. According to a recent well-being report published by the British Dental Association, almost half of general dental practitioners (GDPs) surveyed reported low levels of life satisfaction and 44 per cent reported low levels of happiness.[i] On top of that, 55 per cent admitted to experiencing high levels of anxiety the day prior to being surveyed, which suggests that the number could be even higher if you take into account those dentists who suffer from sporadic episodes of anxiety and nervousness.

As it stands, the exact number of dentists suffering from an addiction problem and/or mental illness is unknown. What we do know, however, is that high levels of stress at work can have a negative effect on emotional well-being and mental health,[ii] which is why the profession must continue to place importance on staff welfare. After all, with the right help and support, such a risk could be completely avoided.

Luckily, there is help available for those dentists that need a hand with getting over an addiction. The Dentists’ Health Support Programme, which is managed by the Dentists’ Health Support Trust (DHST) offers dentists in difficulty an opportunity to remedy their problems, get their life back on track and, where possible, back into practice. Part of the struggle can be to admit to having a problem, but with the help of an organisation like DHST, which has an 80 per cent success rate (the highest of any comparable charity in the country), dentists can receive the necessary diagnosis and intervention that they need to get better.

All support, treatment, rehabilitation and assistance with recovery and reintegration is delivered by an expert team comprising of a psychiatric nurse and a recovering alcoholic with many years of sobriety under his belt. Without such a service, dentists would have no-one to turn to – and it is for that reason that the profession must continue to offer its support to charities like DHST. Similar to other organisations within the dental sphere, the work of the Dentists’ Health Support Programme relies entirely on the generosity of the profession for its funding.

 

One of the establishments that has taken an active role in providing monetary support is the Association of Dental Groups (ADG). “At the ADG, we are very much aware of the importance of providing support to dentists in need,” says David Worskett, the Chairman of the ADG. “That is why we will continue to assist the Trust and the delivery of the Programme as much as we can, and we encourage others, where possible, to do the same.

“While addiction isn’t a prevalent problem in the profession, it is important that a service is available, even if it serves just one person.”

The Dentists’ Health Support Trust is grateful for all of the support that it receives from the profession. If you would like to help, get in touch with the Trust today – any donation, no matter how big or small, would be hugely appreciated.

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk

 

For more information about the Dentists’ Health Support Trust call 020 7224 4671 or visit www.dentistshealthsupporttrust.org

 



[i] British Dental Association. Is there a well-being gap among UK dentists? 2015. Accessed online January 2016 at https://www.bda.org/dentists/policy-campaigns/research/workforce-finance/gp/Documents/Dentists'%20well-being%20%20report.pdf

[ii] Myers, HL, Myers LB. ‘It’s difficult being a dentist’: stress and health in the general dental practitioner”. British Dental Journal; 2004; 197 (2): 89-93. Accessed online January 2017 at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15272347

N:B

The Association of Dental Groups (ADG) is a trade association whose members are dental providers and employers using a corporate or group model to serve both private and NHS patients across the UK.

Dentistry in the UK is changing rapidly. One of the key characteristics of these changes is recognition that good business models and consistent best practice are vital to providing the highest standards of patient care.  As dental employers, ADG members are at the forefront of these changes and recognise the importance of innovation, investment and the contribution made by all dental professionals and skill sets in a business.

The ADG’s objectives are to help members:

 

·         To ensure delivery of consistent quality outcomes for patients in a sustainable, high quality manner

·         To support the Government's aim to improve access to high quality dental care

·         To adopt and maintain best practice across all their practices

·         To work with the NHS to promote prevention of dental health problems

·         To modernise working practices and maximise the roles of all dental professionals in dentistry

  • To work with regulators and commissioners to ensure that regulation supports and responds to the changing needs 

 

 

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NOV
08
0

A Day in the Life of a Clinical Lead

A Day in the Life of a Clinical Lead

 

Dr Mark Hughes is a Clinical Lead for Bupa Dental, which is a member of the Association of Dental Groups. Here, he discusses how his daily life has changed since joining the corporate…

 

 

It has been just over two years since Bupa Dental acquired our group of practices. I was previously a partner in the business, based in the City, West End and Canary Wharf. Our focus was primarily corporate dental clients, with an emphasis on dental insurance schemes alongside private patients. 

 

I took on the role of Clinical Lead for the group, while also caring for a full patient list. Having been involved from 1998 to 2014, I had become very busy with regular and new clients covering all aspects of general dental care. In addition, I was liaising with the other dentists, dental nurses and hygienists regularly to identify any issues. We prided ourselves on responding to clinical and personal concerns quickly, despite the increasing size of the group.

 

When we announced the change of ownership, there were varied concerns from both the clinical and administrative staff. I suppose we all have an image of a faceless, financially driven, uncaring business when the word ‘corporate’ is linked with dental practice, so there was a degree of scepticism to manage. As there had been a long consultation process prior to the sale, however, we were convinced that the new group shared our goals and beliefs in how to care for patients and move the business forward. As such, we were pleased to find these concerns did not come to fruition.

 

I was offered the role of Clinical Lead within Bupa alongside my usual clinical duties. This has involved being a part of the clinical governance process including audits, interviewing new clinicians, complaint handling and acting as a link between practitioners and management. I was keen to undertake this role to facilitate the transition between private and corporate ownership, as well as helping the continuity of patient care.

 

Which brings me to the main question many will ask – what is it like working as part of a large organisation?

 

First the caveats; I came from a relatively large group practice where, whilst clinical autonomy was valued, there was a sense of team and shared attitudes to patient care. We had a very low turnover of staff and encouraged meetings and communication in what we hoped was a relaxed working environment.

Also the experience we had joining the corporate were, it goes without saying, unique to our situation and the attitudes and approach of the management team.

 

I hope that I can comment from a relatively impartial standpoint despite being pro-takeover from the outset. In addition, part of what I can report comes from the opinions expressed to me from other staff members after 18 months of new ownership.

 

So what has changed? On a day-to-day basis, very little. Bupa Dental has great belief in clinical freedom while remaining aligned with mainstream dental thinking. This extends to a very broad, though not limitless, choice of materials, along with keeping individual dentists’ favoured laboratories open to them. In fact, when the practices meet for CPD evenings, exploring new techniques and materials is actively encouraged. This is not to say that the commercial aspects of the dental business are overlooked, rather that the importance of high clinical standards is a priority. This leads to another plus of operating within a larger group; the depth of clinical experience available across the whole spectrum of general and specialist dentistry. The ability to send an email out across such a large number of dentists asking for opinions cannot be underestimated. What’s more, a larger corporate can market and promote its services, skills and individual practices to a much wider audience than could be achieved by a single practice.

 

I think some of the benefits of working for a large organisation depend on your perspective – for example, a practice owner will drastically reduce their paperwork by selling to a corporate and becoming an associate. In my experience, other members of the team have reported seeing little difference in their administrative responsibilities, or indeed a slight increase in line with the corporate’s emphasis on self audit and appraisal. Whether this is symptomatic of working for a large organisation, or merely representative of the increasing governance faced by all clinical staff, is debatable ­– similarly, some people appreciate the email reminders and others find them intrusive!

 

Ultimately, the fact that the practice I work in is owned by a corporate has made little impact to the way I approach my clinical day – I have retained my clinical freedom and responsibility to patients. However it’s great to know that I have the support of a larger healthcare company backing me up so I can focus on being a dentist.

 

To find out more about the ADG and member groups, please visit http://www.dentalgroups.co.uk

 

NB: The views expressed in this and similar columns by individual ADG members are intended to stimulate constructive debate about current issues in dentistry. Thoughts are the authors’ own and not necessarily those of the ADG.

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NOV
08
0

A day in the life: a young associate dentist

A day in the life: a young associate dentist

 

Christine Gordon is a young associate dentist at Putney Bridge Dental Centre in London, a MyDentist practice which is a member of the Association of Dental Groups (ADG). Since graduating from The University of Sheffield in 2012, she has worked in both an independent and now a corporate practice. Here, she discusses her career so far and how the move into corporate dentistry has impacted on her working life…

“I completed my foundation training at an independently-run practice, which I very much enjoyed. It was in North London, with three surgeries. After finishing my foundation training I took a maternity cover position within a corporate; and have since been lucky to secure a full-time position when another associate left. I've been working at my current practice for almost two years now.

“Working in an independent practice was a little different to where I work now. Firstly, I would say the principal had more control over the associates in terms of materials and their hours. I now have increased flexibility regarding both how I work and the products I work with. For example, I can put in a request for the materials I would like to order and, within reason, these are usually authorised so that I can use the materials I prefer.

“For me, one of the main benefits of a corporate is knowing that all the relevant protocols such as health and safety and cross infection control will be followed to a high standard across the board. We have a CQC inspection coming up and I am not concerned about it in the slightest. I can simply get on with my job with total peace of mind and no last-minute panic that the practice won't pass and will need to implement any big changes! 

“Also, when I finished the initial maternity cover with the corporate, there was about a month before my full-time role began and I was worried about having no Units of Dental Activity (UDAs) to do during that period. But then I was told about a nearby practice in the group that I would be able to work with in the meantime. Once you begin working within a corporate, it is easier to pick up more work and opportunities at different locations, should you wish to – which is great.

“At my current practice there is good private potential. I have taken the Inman Aligner course so I can provide simple orthodontic treatment to patients, which has been quite popular. I'm also now offering anti-wrinkle treatments (using Botulinum Toxin) which I'm really enjoying - it helps to keep things interesting. I have a private target every month, separate to my UDA target, so I try to zone my diary to allocate time methodically and ensure I meet both targets. 

“In terms of my typical day, it doesn't differ too much from life in an independent practice. I start at 9am, but try to get in early to review my diary and check any lab work. I took on a list from a dentist who had been there for 15 years, which was a challenge initially as patients were so familiar with her but I think they're used to me now. I see a lot of new patients now too, mostly young professionals, which reflects the area the practice is in; with lots of flats and new builds. My other daily responsibilities are essentially the same as  an independent dentist: working closely with other members of the team to make the patient journey as pleasant as possible and record keeping is very important so I spend time making sure this is accurate. The MyDentist special app reminds me whose notes I still write and this is so helpful, especially when I'm very busy.

“There is a great, friendly atmosphere within my practice – I certainly don’t feel like there is someone miles away, controlling everything, which I think certainly used to be a common misconception regarding dental corporates. I appreciate the clinical support too. We have a Clinical Director and if I have any problems I can just fire off an email and he will help in any way he can. I feel I have access to a lot of people who will help me to develop my career and because I am just three years out of university, this is really important to me. There is obviously a degree of personal preference here, but the strong support network I have found within the dental corporate makes going out into the big, bad world of work a lot less scary for young dentists.”

 

To find out more about the world of ADG please visit http://www.dentalgroups.co.uk

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2680 Hits
FEB
11

The Dental Training Programme – the pledge to support areas of deprivation

The-Dental-Training-Programme--the-pledge-to-support-areas-of-deprivation.jpg

As a Gold Unity Partner of Bridge2Aid, the Association of Dental Groups (ADG) is pleased to support the Kigurusimba Health Centre in the Pangani district, as part of the Dental Training Programme. 

 

Over the course of a six-day assessment, five Clinical Officers and the Bridge2Aid training team were able to treat a staggering 475 patients including Ndahane Mathias, a 37-year-old mother and farmer from Mkalamo village. 

 

Thanks to the provision of this treatment, Ndahane was able to have a tooth removed that had been plaguing her for a brutal three months.

 

By continuing to support the work of Bridge2Aid, deprived areas can be supplied with much needed equipment and training. Thanks to you, the Kigurusimba Health Centre and the five newly trained clinical officers – responsible for approximately 10,000 people – can deliver effective dental care that the local community needs. 

 

To find out how to donate, volunteer and support, contact ADG now: all together we can make a difference. 

 

For more information about the ADG visit  HYPERLINK "http://www.dentalgroups.co.uk" www.dentalgroups.co.uk

 

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3947 Hits
DEC
22

Postgraduate Bursary Award - Closes 31st December, Hurry!

bPostgraduate Bursary Award - Closes 31st December, Hurry!

Following the success of the 2015 Bursary Awards, the Association of Dental Groups (ADG) would like to announce that application for the 2016 Postgraduate Bursary Award is now open.

 

Dental professionals interested in entering the Postgraduate Award should submit their project, focusing on either improving access for disadvantaged people or building awareness of oral cancer and the need for early diagnosis.

 

The proposed project must be implemented during 2015-16 and the winning applicant will receive £5,000, made up of £2,500 for the dentist and a further £2,500 to be used in support of the delivery of the project.

 

The winners of the 2015 ADG Postgraduate Bursary Award were Orna Ni Choileain and Niall McGoldrick for their project ­­­­­­­­Let’s Talk About Mouth Cancer.

 

On winning the Bursary, Orna said: “When I found out we won the Bursary, I had the perfect mixture of shock and excitement. It feels like a great achievement to have our work setting up the 'Let's Talk About Mouth Cancer’ charity recognised by other professionals on a national level. It's a sign of confidence for us and the wider team that all the work we have been doing over the last year has been worthwhile.”

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk

  2418 Hits
2418 Hits
DEC
22

The Latest Research In The Battle Against Oral Cancer- Association of Dental Groups

The Latest Research In The Battle Against Oral Cancer- Association of Dental Groups

The Mouth Cancer Action Month campaign – which was launched by the British Dental Health Foundation and supported by the Association of Dental Groups – may have finished for another year, but there is no doubt that the fight against mouth cancer must go on. Much has been learnt about the disease over recent years, especially in regards to triggers and causes, but over the last year in particular, new research has come to light.

One study, for instance, suggests that there could be a complex network of chemical, viral and (epi)genetic factors that link to the occurrence of oral carcinogenesis.[i] While the factors that trigger this process and the metastasis of oral cancer have not been clarified in this study, the mere suggestion that immune reactions following viral infections may cross-react with tumour suppressor action proteins to create oral cancer could be ground breaking.

Another element that is currently being researched at some length could be crucial to diagnosis, is the mutation of the TP53 gene. Normally, the protein produced by this gene – known as p53 – works to prevent cells from increasing in size. But as studies of the gene show, changes can cause oral squamous cell carcinoma to develop[ii] – which accounts for more than 90% of oral cancers.[iii] Testing for changes to p53 could serve as a prognostic marker, thereby increasing the chances of early detection.

In terms of effective diagnosis, it has also been suggested in research conducted earlier this year, that salivary genomic and proteomic biomarkers could potentially be a successful – and less invasive – approach to testing for oral cancer.[iv] This could prove very beneficial to diagnosis if this were to develop. In the meantime, it is crucial that you continue to screen for oral cancer and invite your patients for regular check-ups.

What still needs to be done, however, is to convince the government that oral cancer is as important as other healthcare issues. That’s not to say that ministers don’t care about oral cancer – for Sir Paul Beresford MP seemed sincerely passionate about the matter at the Mouth Cancer Action Month launch – but it occasionally appears as if other concerns, such as smoking and obesity, take precedence.

It goes without saying that you are all aware of mouth cancer and the health risks that late diagnosis poses. But by keeping up to date with the latest research, maintaining constant vigilance with screenings and treatment pathways and by urging government officials to take greater action, you can keep on top of oral cancer. To find out more, please contact the ADG or British Dental Health Foundation.

 

To donate or for more information visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk or www.dentalhealth.org



[i] Lucchese A. Viruses and Oral Cancer: Crossreactivity as a Potential Link. Anticancer Agents Med Chem. 2015; 15(10): 1224-9. Accessed online November 2015 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26179264

[ii] Khan H, Gupta S, Husain N, Misra S, Negi MPS, Jamal N, Ghatak A. Correlation between expressions of Cyclin-D1, EGFR and p53 with chemoradiation response in patients of locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma. Volume 3, June 2015, Pages 11-17. Accessed online November 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214647414000300

[iii]Markopoulos AK, Michailidou EZ, Tzimagiorgis G. Salivary

markers for oral cancer detection. Open Dent J 2010;4:172-8.

[iv] Bano S, David MP, Indira AP. Salivary Biomarkers for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: An Overview. Vol 1, Issue 8, January 2015. Accessed online November 2015 http://www.ijsscr.com/sites/default/files/articles/IJSS-CR_1(8)_RA02.pdf

 

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2854 Hits
DEC
02

Backing the Future of Dentistry – The Return of the Bursary Awards - applications open until December 31st 2015

Backing the Future of Dentistry – The Return of the Bursary Awards

While innovation and technological advancements will continue to play a key role in the development of dentistry, nurturing the future generation of dental professionals is equally as crucial.
 

As the Association of Dental Groups (ADG) understands the positive impact ingenuity and proactivity can have on a practice and on the profession, it is pleased to be welcoming back the Undergraduate and Postgraduate Bursary Awards in 2016. The ceremony will be held on the 18th March at The Library at the Royal College of Surgeons.                                

With applications open until December 31st 2015, there is still time for budding undergraduate students – including dentists, dental hygienists, dental therapists and clinical dental technicians – to enter their chosen category.

Covering the competencies of ethics, professionalism, scope of practice and communication, the ‘Skill mix in dentistry’ category focuses on ideas relating to teamwork and the use of skills in the dental setting. Alternatively, applicants can choose to enter the ‘Professionalism’ group. All they need to do is describe a time and situation in which professionalism and ethicality have been demonstrated for a chance to win.

With gold, silver and bronze bursary prizes available for both categories – offering £1,000, £750 and £250 respectively – all applications will be judged and awarded by an expert panel.

As Amardeep Singh Dhadwal, the Undergraduate (Professionalism) Gold Award Winner of 2015 comments, “I would definitely recommend other students to enter the competition next year; it is a great opportunity to discuss and consider what dentistry means to you and what you aspire to as a dental professional.”

Indeed, not only is the ADG Undergraduate Bursary Award 2016 an excellent opportunity for personal development in young professionals and a chance to earn the respect of their colleagues, but it is also beneficial to the future care of patients.

The ADG also recognises the talent and commitment of both postgraduate students and dentists with a dental degree undertaking postgraduate training. Offering a bursary of £5,000 to the winner, applications must detail a project to be executed within the UK – either to improve access for disadvantaged people or to build awareness on oral cancers and the need for early diagnosis – and must be implemented during 2016/17.

Although £2,500 of the award must be used to support the delivery of the project, the other half is very much a reward – and will be a well-deserved one at that. As Orna Ni Choileain, who was last year’s joint winner with Niall McGoldrick, highlights however, the bursary is much more than a cash prize. “When I found out we won the bursary, I had the perfect mixture of shock and excitement. It feels like a great achievement to have our work setting up the ‘Let’s Talk About Mouth Cancer’ charity recognised by other professionals on a national level.”

If you are thinking of applying or know somebody that is suitable for the award, contact the ADG today for more information. Who knows, it could be you?

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk

 

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4125 Hits
NOV
15

Take Action Against Oral Cancer - Association of Dental Groups

Take Action Against Oral Cancer - Association of Dental Groups

Brought to you by the British Dental Health Foundation and supported by the Association of Dental Groups (ADG), the Mouth Cancer Action Month campaign is this month, aiming to raise further awareness and rally more support than ever before.
 

“As long term supporters of the British Dental Health Foundation and Mouth Cancer Action Month, we are as pleased as ever to be able to contribute to such a worthy cause,” says Chair of the ADG, David Worskett. “By working together we can tackle oral cancer and make a real difference to those who suffer, one campaign at a time.”

Diagnosis

With the latest figures showing that 6,767 people are diagnosed with mouth cancer in the UK each year,[i] educating and alerting people on the dangers of oral cancer remains crucial for ensuring early diagnosis and treatment.

As it stands, a referral to a specialist must be completed within a two-week time frame,[ii] and there is a one-month maximum wait from the date a decision to treat is made to the first definitive treatment.[iii] For survival rates to increase, delivery of these treatment pathways by NHS England must continue to be implemented and improved upon.

As Chief Executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter OBE explains, “if more of us are aware of the potential dangers of long-lasting mouth ulcers, red and white patches and unusual lumps or swellings in the mouth, there could well be a reduction in the number of mouth cancer cases we are seeing.”

Do Your Bit

Unfortunately however, a lack of patient knowledge is evident, with statistics showing that only 40% of patients who develop oral cancer visit the dentist with concerns.[iv]. As Dr Nigel Carter OBE explains, “If the dental and wider health profession can inform and urge patients to regularly attend dental check-ups, we can increase the chances of mouth cancer being detected at an early stage.” That is why Mouth Cancer Action Month continues its efforts to inform and educate and why it urges you to incorporate regular screening for oral cancer into routine appointments.

Meanwhile, the British Dental Health Foundation will continue to provide educational materials to dental practices, hospitals, GPs and pharmacies, and remains passionate about improving the awareness of patients and professionals alike. Whether it’s through donning a blue ribbon, taking part in the Blue Lip Selfie Campaign, running an event or donating, you can give back to the cause and to your patients. Remember, all the support received really does make a difference to the charity and to the lives of the individuals who have suffered at the hands of oral cancer.

 

To donate or for more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk

 

 



[i] Facts and Figures. Mouth Cancer Action Month. Accessed online August 2015. http://www.mouthcancer.org/facts-figures/

[ii] Your right: urgent two-week referral. The NHS Constitution. Accessed online July 2015. file:///Users/officeone/Downloads/Your%20right%20urgent%20two-week%20referral.pdf

[iii] Delivery Cancer Waiting Times: A Good Practice Guide. Accessed online July 2015. www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/delivering-cancer-wait-times.pdf

[iv] Hollows P, McAndrew P G, Perini M G. Delays in the referral and treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Br Dent J 2000; 188: 262–265. Accessed online July 2015. www.nature.com/bdj/journal/v188/n5/full/4800449a.html

 

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2293 Hits
NOV
02

We Share Because We Care

We Share Because We Care

Working with the British Dental Health Foundation, the Association of Dental Groups (ADG) continues to pledge its support to Mouth Cancer Action Month in November and it’s mission to promote understanding of oral cancer.

 

With over 40 years of experience, the British Dental Health Foundation has dedicated its time to educating, imparting advice and running crucial campaigns, with its messages reaching 560 million people.

 

Together, the ADG and British Dental Health Foundation continue raising awareness of the early signs and symptoms of oral cancer and encouraging regular dental check ups. By increasing the chance of early diagnosis, morbidity rates and the devastating effects of oral cancer can be minimised.

 

Through the Blue Ribbon Appeal and by taking part in Blue Wednesdays and the Blue Lip Selfie Campaign, you can show your support to the cause.

 

Get involved and help change tomorrow’s statistics, today.

 

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk

 

 

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2356 Hits
OCT
30

November, A month To Remember - David Worskett Chairman, Association of Dental Groups

November A month To Remember - David Worskett Chairman Association of Dental Groups

As the Association of Dental Groups (ADG) continues to promote prevention of dental health problems and delivery of quality outcomes for patients in a sustainable, high quality manner, Mouth Cancer Action Month remains of utmost importance.

“As long term supporters of the British Dental Health Foundation and Mouth Cancer Action Month, we are as pleased as ever to be able to contribute to such a worthy cause,” comments Chair of the ADG, David Worskett. “By working together we can tackle oral cancer and make a real difference to those who suffer, one campaign at a time.”

Indeed, now that Mouth Cancer Action Month is underway – as launched by the British Dental Health Foundation on the 29th of October at the House of Commons – the ADG will once again resume its task of raising awareness on diagnosis and prevention.

Currently, statistics show that only 40% of patients who develop mouth cancer visit the dentist with concerns. [i] But as Chief Executive of the British Dental Health Foundation Dr Nigel Carter OBE explains, “if the dental and wider health profession can inform and urge patients to regularly attend dental check-ups, we can increase the chances of mouth cancer being detected at an early stage.”

If any headway is to be made, these wise words must be implemented. Indeed, with the latest figures showing that 6,767[ii] people are diagnosed with mouth cancer in the UK each year, it is important that as many people as possible get involved with Mouth Cancer Action Month.

Whether it’s the Blue Lip Selfie Campaign – where all you need to do is take a selfie of yourself and share it with the hashtag #bluelipselfie – or showing your support by wearing a blue ribbon badge, your participation is crucial to the success of the campaign.

Another useful tool available is the oral cancer CPD module available through the ADG, designed by {my}dentist. While it may not be mandatory, recapping on areas such as early symptoms, referral and treatment pathways for the disease and improving patient awareness could be the difference between saving and losing a life.

That is why the ADG is pleased to announce the return of the CPD module, and hopes that the tool will help in the battle against mouth cancer. The module is free to review, with only a small cost of £25 plus VAT – £5 of which will be donated to the British Dental Health Foundation and the Mouth Cancer Action Month campaign – for those wishing to apply for a CPD certificate.

Ultimately, the campaign needs all the help and support it can get, especially as research indicates that early detection of mouth cancer can result in a survival outcome of 90%.[iii]

 

For more information on Mouth Cancer Action Month, the CPD module and to find out how you can be a part of the month long November campaign, contact the ADG today.

 

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk.

 



[i] Hollows P, McAndrew P G, Perini M G. Delays in the referral and treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Br Dent J 2000; 188: 262–265. Accessed online July 2015. www.nature.com/bdj/journal/v188/n5/full/4800449a.html

[ii] Facts and Figures. Mouth Cancer Action Month. Accessed online August 2015. http://www.mouthcancer.org/facts-figures/

[iii] Facts and figures. Mouth Cancer Action Month. Accessed online October 2015 http://www.mouthcancer.org/facts-figures/

 

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2771 Hits
AUG
08

The Teeth Team – Improving Child Oral Health

The Teeth Team – Improving Child Oral Health

543 Dental Centre and Genix Healthcare, both members of the Association of Dental Groups (ADG), are dedicated supporters of the Teeth Team charity.

 

The well-established school-based supervised tooth brushing programme aims to promote the importance of oral health among children, reducing inequalities and instilling effective dental routines in young people.

The charity’s recent review of dental health among children involved in the scheme found an overall reduction in the presence of decayed, missing or filled teeth (dmft) in the past year. The number of those needing treatment reduced from 25% to 19% between January 2014 and May 2015.

This is encouraging news for both the public and the profession, but with work still to be done, it’s important for all to get involved and help improve oral health for the next generation.

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk.

  4757 Hits
4757 Hits
JUL
13

Association of Dental Groups 2016 Bursary Awards - Applications now open

Association-of-Dental-Groups-2016-Bursary-Awards---Applications-now-open.jpg

Following the success of its 2015 Bursary Awards, the Association of Dental Groups (ADG) would like to announce that applications for 2016 are now open.

Each year, ADG seeks to find the most innovative and inspirational voluntary projects from young dental professionals in the UK through its annual Bursary competition. Divided into separate categories for Postgraduate and Undergraduate entries, all submissions will be judged anonymously by an expert panel, with cash prizes awarded to the winning applicants.

Orna Ni Choileain and Niall McGoldrick won the 2015 Postgraduate award. Orna says: “When I found out we won the bursary, I had the perfect mixture of shock and excitement. It feels like a great achievement to have our work setting up the 'Let's Talk About Mouth Cancer’ charity recognised by other professionals on a national level.”

The ADG’s commitment to developing the clinicians of tomorrow is epitomised by its annual awards, which give young dental professionals the opportunity to be recognised for a specific project or for their own pioneering ideas.

Amardeep Singh Dhadwal won the 2015 Undergraduate (Professionalism) gold award. He says: “I would definitely recommend other students to enter the competition next year; it is a great opportunity to discuss and consider what dentistry means to you and what you aspire to as a dental professional.”

Applications for the 2016 Bursary Awards are now open and entries can be completed using the forms available via the ADG website. If you are interested in entering, or know of someone who might be, visit the website today to find out more.

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk.

 

  2239 Hits
2239 Hits
JUN
17

Applications now open for The Association of Dental Groups 2016 Bursary Awards!

The Association of Dental Groups

Following the success of the 2015 Bursary Awards, the Association of Dental Groups (ADG) would like to announce that applications for 2016 are now open.

 

Each year, ADG seeks to find the most innovative and inspirational voluntary projects from young dental professionals in the UK through its annual Bursary competition. Divided into separate categories for Postgraduate and Undergraduate entries, all submissions will be judged anonymously by an expert panel, with prizes awarded to the winning applicants.

 

The ADG’s commitment to developing the clinicians of tomorrow is epitomised by its annual awards, which give young dental professionals the opportunity to be recognised for a specific project or for their own pioneering ideas.

 

Applications for the 2016 Bursary Award are now open and entries can be completed using the forms available via the ADG website. If you are interested in entering, or know of someone who might be, visit the website today to find out more.

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk.

  2573 Hits
2573 Hits

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