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All that's new in the world of dentistry
JUL
08
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Can we fix it?

Can we fix it?

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FEB
03
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Guess Who?

Guess Who?

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3526 Hits
FEB
03

In safe hands - Sparkle Dental Labs

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Sparkle Dental Labs uses the latest technology and digital CAD/CAM to not only help ensure infection control protocols are met but also provide the best results for you and your patients. 

 

All lab work is manufactured here in the UK by expert technicians who are extremely skilled at their craft. Sparkle Dental Labs carries out both NHS and private work to exceptional standards and provides full traceability for every item so you can feel assured knowing that your restorations are in safe hands. 

 

Sparkle Dental Labs is also fully compliant with all GDC regulations, including infection control, meaning that clients can feel safe in the guarantee that their restorations are in the best hands.

 

Contact the friendly team at Sparkle Dental Labs today to find out how their service could help you.

 

For more details about Sparkle Dental Labs, please call 0800 138 6255, email  HYPERLINK "This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it." This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit:

www.sparkledentallabs.com

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4173 Hits
JAN
14

New Innovative Design - DTS 2016

New Innovative Design - DTS 2016

Andrea Johnson is an orthodontic technician working at the Royal Derby Teaching Hospital and is Vice Chair of the Orthodontic Technicians Association (OTA). She is excited to be speaking at the brand new Orthodontic Technician’s Seminar Stream at The Dental Technology Showcase (DTS) 2016 where she will deliver a presentation entitled “The Unbreakable Herbst Appliance”. Here she speaks with enthusiasm about her seminar:

 

“I saw the new unbreakable Herbst appliance in Italy a few months ago and I’m really excited because it's a brilliant design and I want to tell everyone all about it.

 

“During the seminar I will be describing the innovative new design of the appliance. The original Herbst appliance is very effective for a variety of different problems, primarily where the mandible needs to be postured forward. However, the way the components sit in the acrylic of the appliance make it very prone to breakages and so it can be unreliable. The new design of appliance that I will discuss is almost unbreakable; it has exactly the same function but it operates in a different way and is not as flimsy and fragile.

 

“I will cover the benefits of the new design and the reasons why technicians would want to use the appliance. The design stage will be incorporated and technicians will take away knowledge about how it can be used and also where components can be sourced. This way, technicians can order in the parts and try it out in their own lab.

 

“I imagine that a lot of technicians will be interested in the new design because it is not just applicable to one specific discipline. Undoubtedly, the Herbst appliance would be used more by orthodontic technicians dealing with specified cases but prosthodontic and denture technicians may also use it occasionally.

 

“I will join many other presenters throughout the DTS educational programme who are excited about being able to talk to technicians from across the disciplines. Having that cross-over of knowledge is valuable because the conversations, points and questions that arise offer a range of different perspectives that we ourselves may not have considered.

 

“I think that the co-location of The Dentistry Show and DTS does very well because it’s an exclusive arrangement. Dentists often visit the DTS area to source laboratory services and products, or to seek advice on various techniques and materials. It’s a mutually enjoyable exchange; technicians can also visit stands at The Dentistry Show to see what clinicians are using, which helps us to offer a better service for them in return.

 

“A lot of the other shows cater more for the clinical side of dentistry. To have a venue with a lab-dedicated area featuring a range of lab-based products and services, as well as lectures designed specifically to interest them, is extremely beneficial. I’ve seen other shows try this approach, of course, but DTS seems to be the best.”

 

To attend Andrea’s seminar and to take advantage of the wealth of educational and networking opportunities, book your ticket for DTS 2016 today.

 

DTS 2016 will be held on Friday 22nd and Saturday 23rd April 2016 at the NEC Birmingham, co-located with The Dentistry Show.

For more information visit www.the-dts.co.uk, call 020 7348 5263 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

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2480 Hits
JUL
27

Take Away the Grind | Sparkle Dental Labs

Take Away the Grind | Sparkle Dental Labs

Do you have patients that grind their teeth and cause dental damage?

 

Sparkle Dental Labs can join you in the fight against destruction and to help reduce the effects of bruxism by producing top quality night guards and splints.

After a detailed impression, you can rely on the expert knowledge of award-winning Sparkle Dental Labs to create accurate and efficient appliances.

As one of the largest British dental laboratories, Sparkle Dental Labs’ team of highly experienced technicians are committed to providing consistently good workmanship using cutting-edge technology and processes.

All products are handcrafted using first class, traceable materials, to exacting British standards and in full compliance with the regulations.

Dedicated to patient care, Sparkle Dental Labs understands that each patient deserves the best and extends the upmost attention to detail to every product.

Help your patients to avoid the damage of the grind now – put your trust in the expert hands of Sparkle Dental Labs and contact the team today.

 

For any additional information please call 0800 138 6255 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit:

www.sparkledentallabs.com
 

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2650 Hits
JUL
19

Which implant is best? | Sparkle Dental Labs

Which implant is best? | Sparkle Dental Labs

Over the past couple of decades there has been a rapid rise in the use of dental implants to replace missing teeth. This has led to an increase in the development of implants and with more than 500 available on the market the choice is vast[1].

The large numbers of implants available come in all shapes and sizes with considerable variations in the material used, the morphology of the implant, the type of abutment connection and the surface characteristics1.

From a chemical point of view, they are currently being manufactured from three groups: metals, ceramics and polymers. These are commonly divided by biocompatibility based on the type of biological response they elicit in the long-term interaction with the host tissue. These include biotolerant (stainless steel, chromium-cobalt alloy), bioinert (titanium, carbon) and bioactive (hydroxylapatite, ceramic oxidized aluminium)[2],[3].

Titanium remains the material of choice, as it offers no allergic and immunological reactions and no neoplasm formation. Bone grows along the titanium oxide surface, which is formed immediately (9-10 seconds) after contact with air or tissue fluid and can reach a thickness of 2-10nm in one second. This stable surface is biocompatible and provides high corrosion resistance, high passivity and resistance to chemical attack3,[4].

Implants also vary in design. The majority of modern root form dental implants are threaded, although the thread pitch or profile can differ significantly between manufactures. Threads play an important role in primary stability and long-term success of dental implants. The micro-thread, for example, features small threads around the neck, which engage the dense cortical bone better and distribute occlusal loads more optimally[5].

Surface properties of the implant can also greatly influence the longevity and function of the implant-supported prosthesis[6]. Rough implant surfaces result in better osseointegration than smooth surfaces, though smooth surfaces seem to have a reduced risk of future bone resorption3.

Surface design is one factor along with length, diameter and shape that affects the contact area; this consequently impacts on stability and the ability of the prosthetic to withstand force. The maximal load is proportional to the total bone-implant contact surface, although the ideal fixture size remains to be determined. However, the dimension of implants should be congruent with the bone available at the surgical site and the treatment plan2.

Implant dentistry is an evolving science with new materials and designs continually being introduced. Working with a laboratory that uses the latest technology and research to create high-quality implants is essential.

Sparkle Dental Labs is one such laboratory that continues to invest in research, development and the latest state-of-the-art technology. The wide range of outstanding implants includes those from the most popular brands, which are all crafted by experienced, highly skilled UK technicians. The high quality materials complement the expert craftsmanship and with full traceability for every item, you are guaranteed first class products every time.

Implantology continues to advance, and by working with a leading lab, dental professionals can liaise with expert technicians to ensure the best implant is chosen for every case, aiding integration and optimising success.

 

For more details about Sparkle Dental Labs, please call 0800 138 6255, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit:

www.sparkledentallabs.com

 



[1] Barfeie, A., Wilson, J., & Rees, J. (2015). Summary of: Implant surface characteristics and their effect on osseointegration. British Dental Journal, 218, 292-293.

[2] Huang, L., Shotwell, J. L., & Wang, H. (2005). Dental implants for orthodontic anchorage. American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, 127, 713-722.

[3] Barfeie, A., Wilson, J., & Rees, J. (2015). Implant surface characteristics and their effect on osseointegration. British Dental Journal, 218, 1-9.

[4] Variola, F., et al. (2011). Nanoscale surface modifications of medically-relevant metals: state-of-the art and perspectives. Nanoscale, 3 (2), 335-353.

[5] Association of Dental Implantology. A dentist’s guide to implantology. Available online: http://www.adi.org.uk/profession/dentist_guide/a-dentists-guide-to-implantology.pdf [Accessed 26th January 2015].

[6] Ogle, O. E. (2015). Implant surface material, design, and osseointegration. Dental Clinics of North America, in press.

 

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3094 Hits
JUL
19

A Competitive Advantage | The Angulated Screw Channel from Nobel Biocare

A Competitive Advantage | The Angulated Screw Channel from Nobel Biocare

Luc and Patrick Rutten are dental laboratory partners and dental technician educators from Belgium. They have been impressed with the Angulated Screw Channel® (ASC) concept from Nobel Biocare.

 

“The new ASC abutment has changed the way we work,” they say. “The titanium interface is more predictable than the old zirconia connection we used to rely on.

“The ability to offer a cement-free retention option is very important. Lots of dentists prefer screw-retained restorations because of the hazards of cement remnants and the complexity of cementing.

 “The ASC concept definitely gives us a competitive advantage.”

The ASC abutment and accompanying Omnigrip™ tooling offer new opportunities for the restoration of implants in the aesthetic zone.  The abutment can be placed at an angle of up to 25 degrees anywhere in a 360-degree radius, providing enhanced access even when working in limited space. With no cement necessary, there is also no risk of irritation to the gingival tissue.

For predictable and highly effective implant restorations in more cases, discover the ASC abutment and Omnigrip tooling from Nobel Biocare.

 

For more information, contact Nobel Biocare on 0208 756 3300 or visit www.nobelbiocare.com

  2987 Hits
2987 Hits
JUN
15

Dentures: Quality and Care - Sparkle Dental Labs

Dentures: Quality and Care - Sparkle Dental Labs

Nearly 15 million people in Britain wear removable dentures[i], and with an increasingly aging population, the number of people requiring prostheses is likely to rise. But how much care do your patients take keeping their dentures clean? Do they require more information about how to look after them and why it’s so important for them to do so?

A recent study found that the vast majority of patients assessed (84%) had very poor levels of denture hygiene[ii]. This was attributed to the lack of hygiene instructions given by dental professionals, as after clinician led patient education, denture cleanliness index (DCI) scores increased significantly2.

Currently there is no clearly defined or regularly used standard or scoring system for determining denture hygiene in the UK. Therefore, the researchers devised the DCI scoring system prior to the audit, which ranges from 0-4. Additional studies are required to refine, test and evaluate the classification, however it could help dental professionals in the future to determine denture hygiene status of patients and highlight any areas of concern2.

Compared to dental care, denture hygiene has received little attention, yet neglecting to look after prostheses can significantly increase an individual’s risk of developing oral infections and systemic diseases[iii],[iv].

Dentures offer a reservoir for microorganisms to thrive and it is well documented that patients wearing partial sets are at a higher risk of developing periodontal disease and dental decay of the teeth directly adjacent to the dentures[v].

Several studies have shown that plaque biofilm accumulates on the internal surface of dentures and certain pathogens may even preferentially colonise on prostheses over oral soft tissues3,[vi]. Acting as a reservoir for bacteria and fungal microorganisms, these pathogens are involved not only in the appearance of local infections like denture stomatitis, but also systemic diseases such as endocarditis, pneumonia and respiratory track infections3.

Problems can also arise if there are any surface defects or other flaws in the denture which are either inherent and due to the fabrication process or acquired due to general use. These can cause imperfections and roughness, which increases the surface area on which bacteria can adhere and potentially colonise[vii].

Furthermore, if the finish is rough it can make cleaning the prosthesis and mechanical removal of the microorganisms difficult, as well as causing discoloration of the denture base materials. The irregularities on the surface can provide niches in which microorganisms are protected from oral hygiene measures, thus allowing the entrapped microbial cells to attach irreversibly to the prosthesis7.

Working with a laboratory, such as Sparkle Dental Labs, that complies with all of the current standards and regulations, uses the very best materials and creates dentures that fit perfectly is essential. The renowned company are able to offer complete traceability on every item and all dentures are fitted to duplicate models to ensure ultimate precision and patient comfort.

In the future the DCI scoring system could be used to help practitioners to identify patients suffering from poor denture hygiene. However, in the mean time dental professionals are encouraged to continue to fit quality dentures and offer patients oral healthcare advice.

 

For more details about Sparkle Dental Labs, please call 0800 138 6255, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit:

www.sparkledentallabs.com



[i] Health & Social Care Information Centre. Adult Dental Health Survey. Published 24th March 2011. Available online: http://www.hscic.gov.uk/article/3894/Adult-Dental-Health-Survey [Accessed 23rd December 2014].

[ii] Mylonas, P., et al. (2014). A clinical audit of denture cleanliness in general dental practice undertaken in the west midlands. British Dental Journal, 217.

[iii] de Andrade, I. M., et al. (2014). Trial of an experimental caster oil solution for cleaning dentures. Brazilian Dental Journal, 25 (1).

[iv] Milward, P., et al. (2013). Knowledge of removable partial denture wearers on denture hygiene. British Dental Journal, 215 (10).

[v] Coulthwaite, L., & Verran, J. (2007). Potential pathogenic aspects of denture plaque. British Journal of Biomedical Science, 64 (4), 180-189.

[vi] Salerno, C., et al. (2011). Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Oral Medicine and Pathology, 16 (2), 139-143.

[vii] Govindswamy., et al. (2014). The influence of surface roughness on the retention of candida albicans to denture base acrylic resins – an in vitro study. Journal of Nepal Dentists Association, 14 (1), 1-9.

 

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2671 Hits
JUN
23
0

Technicians under the Microscope

Technicians under the Microscope

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4870 Hits

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