The GDPUK.com Blog

All that's new in the world of dentistry
JUL
24
0

Oral health – where do we go from here?

FMC_GROUPPANELPIC

 

 

On 15 March, Johnson & Johnson hosted The OH! Panel at the British Dental Association in London.

Chaired by Stephen Hancocks, it brought together eight key opinion leaders in dentistry: Ben Atkins; Julie Deverick; Penny Hodge; Tim Newton; Anthony Roberts; Julie Rosse; Nicola West; and Helen Whelton. Each was selected for their ability to provide unique insight into how the dental profession can be best supported going forwards, given the current oral health landscape.

A vision was agreed by The Panel as something all dental professionals should work by to help improve patients’ oral health:

‘The ultimate outcome is to improve oral health and therefore systemic health. The vision is that every dental health care professional, upon seeing a patient with gingivitis and / or periodontitis, can and will:

• Make a diagnosis(es) and communicate the relevance of the condition to the patient. Explore risk factors and modify behaviour for successful outcomes

• Help every patient who receives the diagnosis(es) to be empowered to improve their oral health for life.’

Julie Deverick commented: ‘I’m excited about the vision in the statement, because it’s something we can all now bring to our Societies and to our profession.’

Johnson & Johnson have an ongoing commitment to the vision statement, and will work with that in mind, ensuring that all professional communications support the concept, to the benefit of the profession and patients.

The OH! Panel was a natural extension of The OH! Challenge, which was launched at the 2017 British Dental Conference and Exhibition. At the event, dental health care professionals (DHCPs) were invited to undertake a simple survey, created to test their knowledge in relation to key oral health topics. This provided valuable data for the creation of a communications programme to support DHCPs in keeping their knowledge current.

In total, 464 dental health care professionals took part in the survey. Overall, the average score amongst all participants was 51%.

Further key findings included:

• 46% did not know that gingivitis and periodontitis are a continuum of the same inflammatory disease

• Only 44% knew the updated BPE guidelines for code 3 sextants

Please visit www.listerineprofessional.co.uk to see the results in more detail, to take the test and to access the supporting programme of evidence-based content.

 

Panel bios

Ben Atkins is the lead clinician of a prototype practice. He is a council member for the National Association of Primary Care, a BDA Press and Parliamentary Representative, a clinical advisor to NICE, and a Trustee of the Oral Health Foundation.

Julie Deverick is a dental hygienist and President-Elect of the British Society of Dental Hygiene and Therapy (BSDHT), taking on the role of President in November 2018.

Stephen Hancocks is a dentist and Editor-in-Chief of the British Dental Journal. A well-known personality within the dental industry, he is also an accomplished speaker, lecturer and performer.

Penny Hodge is a specialist periodontist and an Honorary Senior Clinical Lecturer at the University of Glasgow Dental School. She is also the President of the British Society of Periodontology. 

Tim Newton is Professor of Psychology as Applied to Dentistry at King’s College London Dental Institute. He has worked in behavioural sciences in relation to dentistry for over 25 years.

Anthony Roberts is Professor of Restorative Dentistry (Periodontology), Clinical and Academic Lead for the Diploma of Dental Hygiene, and Head of Department of Restorative Dentistry, all at University College Cork.

Julie Rosse is a practising dental hygienist at three dental practices. She was the President of the BSDHT between 2012 and 2014, and is a member of the British Society of Periodontology.

Nicola West is a Professor/Honorary Consultant in Restorative Dentistry (Periodontology) at Bristol Dental Hospital, Honorary Secretary of the British Society of Periodontology, and Secretary General of the European Federation of Periodontology (EFP) 2019.

Helen Whelton is a Professor and Head of the College of Medicine and Health at University College Cork. She is a recent past-President of the International Association for Dental Research.

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MAY
23
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Mind the gap: The oral health essentials that the nation is missing

Consumer-Oral-Health-Survey-2018-1

The British public could be putting their oral health - and even their general health - at risk as new research reveals that millions are overlooking the basic oral health essentials such as brushing, flossing and visiting the dentist.

The annual survey[i], conducted by YouGov on behalf of Simplyhealth Professionals, revealed shocking statistics including that only two thirds of adults brush twice a day (69%), and two percent admitting that they never brush.

Flossing is also frequently ignored, with one in three adults (37%) admitting they never take the time to floss, despite the fact that 63% know that it helps to avoid gum disease. When questioned why they don’t floss more regularly, 27% said they couldn’t be bothered or find it boring.

Furthermore, almost one in 10 (7%) are avoiding the dental chair and said they never visit the dentist.

Commenting on the figures, Henry Clover, Chief Dental Officer at Simplyhealth Professionals, said: “With the busy lifestyles that people lead, it’s tempting to skip brushing or flossing, or delay visits to the dentist. A good oral health routine is an essential everyday activity that helps to protect against tooth decay and gum disease. Moreover, with studies increasingly finding links between poor oral health and conditions such as heart disease, strokes and diabetes, looking after your oral health is important for your general health too.”

Those adults avoiding the dentist could also be setting a bad example for the younger generation, with over a fifth[ii] (22%) of parents of children aged 18 or under saying their child only brushes their teeth once a day or less, and 2% saying their child never brushes.

Childhood tooth decay continues to be a huge issue in the UK, and remains the number one reason why children aged five to nine years old are admitted to hospital in England[iii]. 19% of parents surveyed said their child had at least one filling and, shockingly, 46% saying their child had their first filling when they were seven years old or younger.

Worryingly, the survey also revealed that 83% of adults said they never check their mouths for signs of mouth cancer. With recent figures[iv] showing that cases of mouth cancer are up by a third in the last decade, and with around 18 people being diagnosed with the disease every day in the UK, the implications of not self-checking could be serious.

“Regular visits to the dentist can help to spot the early signs of mouth cancer, but it’s important to be aware of the symptoms and any changes that you see or feel in your mouth between dental appointments,” explains Henry. “These can include unusual lumps or swellings in the mouth or head and neck area; ulcers that don’t heal within three weeks; and red and white patches in the mouth.”

 

 

[i] All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc, on behalf of Simplyhealth.  Total sample size was 5,264 adults. Fieldwork was undertaken between 12th -19th February 2018.  The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all UK adults (aged 18+).

[ii] All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc. Parents of children aged 18 years old and under were surveyed; and if there was more than one child in the family, we asked parents to answer based on the child whose birthday fell next. Total sample size was 4,294 adults. Fieldwork was undertaken from 9th to 16th February 2018. The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all UK adults (aged 18+)

[iii] The Faculty of Dental Surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, The state of children’s oral health in England report, January 2015.

[iv] Oral Health Foundation – www.mouthcancer.org

Simplyhealth Professionals is the UK’s leading dental payment plan specialist with more than 6,500 member dentists nationwide caring for approximately 1.7 million patients registered to a Denplan product.

Simplyhealth Professionals provides the following range of leading Denplan dental payment plans under the Denplan name:

  • Denplan Care: all routine and restorative care + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover
  • Denplan Essentials: routine care only + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover
  • Denplan for Children: routine and other agreed care + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover
  • Denplan Membership: registered with the dentist + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover
  • Denplan Hygiene: A dental payment plan without dental insurance for all types of practice from NHS, mixed and private to support patients commit to a consistent hygiene programme.
  • Denplan Emergency Insurance: worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover only

Simplyhealth Professionals also provide a wide range of professional services for its member dentists and their practice teams, including the Denplan Quality Programme and Denplan Excel Accreditation Programme.  Plus regulatory advice, business and marketing consultancy services and networking opportunities.

Dentist enquiries telephone: 0800 169 9962.

For patient enquiries telephone: 0800 401 402   

www.simplyhealth.co.uk

www.simplyhealthprofessionals.co.uk       

  819 Hits
819 Hits
JUL
14
0

OH! Challenge reveals dental profession’s knowledge gap

OH! Challenge reveals dental profession’s knowledge gap

 

 

 

The OH! Challenge has indicated knowledge gaps among the dental profession on a number of oral health topics, with an average knowledge score of just 51%. Launched at this year’s BDA Conference, the OH! Challenge was created to test oral health knowledge and has emphasised some interesting knowledge gaps, including:

• 46% did not know that gingivitis and periodontitis are a continuum of the same inflammatory disease

• Only 44% knew the updated BPE guidelines for code 3 sextants

• Just 3% understood that advice to rinse all traces of fluoridated toothpaste after brushing depended upon the patient's oral health needs.

These results will inform a programme of evidence-based articles for the dental team, designed to increase understanding of these all-important issues.

Iain Chapple, Professor of Periodontology, commented:

‘As a periodontologist, I was quite alarmed to see that 22% of DHCPs did not know what a BPE code 1 meant. Equally, only 23% of respondents knew that twice-daily brushing for just two minutes was likely to be insufficient for patients with periodontitis. We all benefit from continuing professional development and this is a very practical and relevant way of targeting ongoing education to keep healthcare professionals up to date.’

Dental Hygienist, Julie Rosse, also commented:

‘The results are a gentle reminder that we need to constantly revise and refresh our sources of evidence-based information in our everyday working lives.  It is obvious that we might not be using the latest evidence-based information available.’

  

Please visit www.listerineprofessional.co.uk now to see the results in more detail, to test your own knowledge and to follow the supporting programme of evidence-based content that will be released in instalments over the course of the year.

 

The OH! Challenge was created by Johnson & Johnson, the makers of LISTERINE®.

 

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2522 Hits
JUL
10
0

Are you looking for ways to help improve your patients’ current oral care routines?

 

 

LISTERINE® Professional is now offering a variety of programmes focused on the most important topics facing dental professionals, including prevention strategies and patient communication.

  • The LISTERINE® Professional Newsletter: A once-monthly e-mail to keep you informed on how to help patients treat or prevent common oral care conditions like gingivitis and sensitivity, or how to help prevent cavities.
  • THE HABIT CHANGE CHALLENGE: An interactive learning programme to help you influence changes in patient behaviour even more effectively

By signing up for both or either programme(s) today, you will gain access to:     

                                                           

  • Clinical data that you can apply to your practice
  • Tips on how to increase patient adherence to your recommendations
  • Free LISTERINE® samples for you and your patients
  • Information on upcoming conventions and events
  • LISTERINE® product information and news

 

SIGN UP TODAY

  3030 Hits
3030 Hits
JUN
28
0

FGDP(UK) and Simplyhealth Professionals launch holistic dentistry conference – 3rd November 17

FGDP(UK) and Simplyhealth Professionals launch holistic dentistry conference – 3rd November 17

 

 

To celebrate their 25th Anniversary the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK), in partnership with Simplyhealth Professionals, is delighted to announce a celebratory conference featuring six of the UK’s leading experts, from a range of oral health fields, assembled for the first time in one exciting programme.

This unique conference is designed for clinicians at all stages of their careers and brings together six highly respected names to deliver a fascinating insight into the complex inter-relationships between oral diseases and the general health of patients in all age groups.

“Dentistry and healthcare in general are changing,” says Mick Horton, Dean of the FGDP(UK).

“We can no longer view areas of the body in isolation; what we do as professionals can impact on the rest of the body, and vice-versa. This holistic approach to treatment brings together modern techniques and their relationship with general disease.”

 

For further information and to secure your place for 3rd November at the National Motorcycle Museum visit http://holisticdentistry.eventbrite.com. Book now for early bird offers.

 

 

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2781 Hits
JUN
07
0

Simplyhealth Professionals is bowled over by Boundaries for Life and its fight against mouth cancer

Simplyhealth Professionals is bowled over by Boundaries for Life and its fight against mouth cancer

 

 

Simplyhealth Professionals has announced today its sponsorship of Boundaries for Life and this year’s cricket season. Boundaries for Life is an initiative aimed at promoting health awareness through high-profile cricket events – and is the only free health screening that includes an assessment for mouth cancer.

Founded in 2010 by Dr Chet Trivedy, a dual-qualified dentist and medic with an interest in emergency medicine and dental emergencies, Boundaries for Life offers free health screenings at major cricket fixtures throughout the UK, and is supported by the European Health Stadia Network.

 

Catherine Rutland, Head of Professional Support Services at Simplyhealth Professionals, said: “The Boundaries for Life programme crosses the barriers between oral health and general health. Our support of the programme goes beyond just a financial investment. We are encouraging our member dentists to get actively involved and be part of the dental team at the cricket matches, and play a part in helping people understand the importance of looking after their health.”

With a team comprising dentists, doctors, nurses, medical students and dementia specialists, the free health checks take no more than 15 minutes and are offered to spectators and ground staff. The checks include blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar (diabetes), dental (mouth cancer), obesity and dementia advice.

The team have already attended two cricket matches with the support of member dentists from Simplyhealth Professionals and carried out a number of dental checks. These matches were at Headingly Stadium on 24 May and the Ageas Bowl on 27 May.

Dr Chet Trivedy said: “Using cricket as a vehicle to discuss health is ideal, particularly as our key aim is to target men aged 35 years and over. Our health promotion strategy is to target people who might otherwise not access regular health checks. Many of these are cited by Public Health England to be particularly vulnerable to a range of health conditions; the format and duration of a match makes the health screenings we offer very accessible – without missing the sporting action.”

Since its launch, Boundaries for Life has carried out 2,000 free health checks and diagnosed nine cases of suspected mouth cancer, or pre-cancer, and given many hundreds of cricket fans specialist advice on how to improve oral and personal health.

The current Boundaries for Life fixtures are:

Match

Venue

Date

Royal London One Day Cup Final

Lord’s, London

Saturday 1 July

England vs South Africa Test

Emirates Old Trafford, Manchester

Sunday 6 August

England vs West Indies Test

Edgbaston, Birmingham

Saturday 19 and Sunday 20 August

 

For more information, visit: http://boundariesforlife.co.uk/

 

 

 

 

Dental

Simplyhealth Professionals is the UK’s leading dental payment plan specialist with more than 6,500 member dentists nationwide caring for approximately 1.7 million patients registered to a Denplan product.

Simplyhealth Professionals provide the following range of leading Denplan dental payment plans under the Denplan name:

·         Denplan Care: all routine and restorative care + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover

·         Denplan Essentials: routine care only + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover 

·         Denplan for Children: routine and other agreed care + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover 

·         Denplan Membership: registered with the dentist + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover 

·         Denplan Hygiene: A dental payment plan without dental insurance for all types of practice from NHS, mixed and private to support patients commit to a consistent hygiene programme.

·         Denplan Emergency Insurance: worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover only

Simplyhealth Professionals also provide a wide range of professional services for its member dentists and their practice teams, including the Denplan Quality Programme and Denplan Excel Accreditation Programme. Plus regulatory advice, business and marketing consultancy services and networking opportunities.

Dentist enquiries telephone: 0800 169 9962, or patient enquiries telephone: 0800 401 402.   

 

 

 

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2207 Hits
MAY
26
0

Take The Oral Health Challenge

 
 
 
Yesterday, Johnson & Johnson, the makers of LISTERINE®, launched The Oral Health (OH) Challenge at the 2017 British Dental Conference and Exhibition.
 
The OH Challenge is a simple survey tool created for dental health care professionals to test their knowledge in relation to soft tissue health and preventive care, and to identify any gaps in current professional knowledge.
 
We want you to take part, so we cordially invite all delegates to stand C13 to complete this important survey challenge. Your involvement and the results gathered will help create bespoke articles for the dental profession, designed to increase understanding of these all-important issues.
 
The OH Challenge is supported by Iain Chapple, Professor of Periodontology, Consultant in Restorative Dentistry and Head of the School of Dentistry at the University of Birmingham, and Julie Rosse, a past President of the British Society of Dental Hygiene and Therapy and practicing hygienist.
 
Professor Iain Chapple commented, ʻThe OH Challenge is an educational initiative for the oral healthcare team at all levels, to help individuals identify any gaps in their knowledge and follow-up with the subsequent educational material that will be rolled out throughout 2017. I genuinely believe this will help all clinicians to remain up to dateʼ
 
Julie Rosse added: ʻI am sure we all like to think that we strive to stay up to date with current concepts and thinking but, indeed, how do we know if our sources of information are the latest available and evidence-based? This simple survey challenges what every clinician truly knows about soft tissue health, whilst the content that follows will help you to manage your patientsʼ oral health.ʼ
 
The OH Challenge is available online for all dental health care professionals. Please visit www.listerineprofessional.co.uk now to test your own knowledge and follow the supporting programme of evidence-based content that will be released in instalments over the course of the year.
 
For more information on LISTERINE® please visit www.listerineprofessional.co.uk
.
 
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2236 Hits
MAY
25
0

NEW Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste Prevents More Than Just Dental Caries

NEW Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste Prevents More Than Just Dental Caries

 

 

Clinically proven to reduce gum problems with unique ActivREPAIR™ technology

Today at the BDA Conference, Oral-B has launched the NEW Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste.

 

Gum problems, a leading cause of tooth loss, can often be prevented through proper at-home oral care and regular visits to a dental professional. Today, more than 50% of the world’s adult population suffers from gum problems and in most/many cases patients ignore or even do not notice the symptoms of gum problems until it is too late, something that must be incredibly frustrating for a dental professional.

Dr Phil Ower, immediate past president of the British Society of Periodontology, commented: “It is our duty as dental professionals to act in the prevention, early diagnosis, and effective treatment of gum problems in order to combat the potentially serious effect of these issues."

Proper brushing, coupled with specialized toothpaste, not only can prevent gum problems, but also improve gum health.

Proper mechanical plaque control is the cornerstone to reduce gingivitis. However, there is clinical evidence that specialized toothpaste can provide additional gum health benefits. More specifically, over 31 studies show that Stabilized Stannous Fluoride adds value to tooth-brushing through reducing gum inflammation and bleeding.  

“Oral-B has a long history of supporting dental professionals.  Our goal is to always provide superior oral care products that continue the care that starts in your chair, helping your patients achieve stronger teeth and healthier gums”, stated Jane Kidson, Oral-B Professional Oral Health Country Manager.

Oral-B first introduced Stannous Fluoride in the 1950’s to prevent carries. Since then, Oral-B invested over a decade of research to evolve the Stannous technology to also help patients significantly improve gum health and prevent enamel erosion.

Today, Oral-B is introducing the NEW Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste to help patients address the increasing prevalence of gum or enamel issues. Featuring unique ActivRepairTM technology (with 2 sources of Stannous: Stannous Fluoride and Stannous Chloride), it is the best clinically-proven toothpaste from Oral-B to help restore gum health and prevent enamel erosion.

 

Benefits of Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste

NEW Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair is the best clinically-proven toothpaste from Oral-B to help reduce gum problems and prevent enamel erosion.

Reduces gum problems[i]

  • ActivRepair™ technology provides 70% more Stannous vs. Oral-B Pro-Expert for better bacterial control through antibacterial action and bacterial growth inhibition of the plaque.
  • Through this, the new Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair toothpaste can deliver up to 72% greater reduction in gum problems versus ordinary toothpastes[ii].

 

 

Helps prevent enamel erosioni

  • ActivRepair™ Technology actively remineralizes weakened enamel and builds a protective smear layer that protects teeth against acid erosion even beyond pH<3.5.
  • With continued use, Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste makes teeth 3x stronger against enamel erosion vs ordinary toothpastes[iii]

Benefits of Brushing with Oral-B

The use of a specialized toothpaste such as Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste, in combination with Oral-B’s iconic round brush head that cleans better than a manual toothbrush, supports your patients by helping them to brush at their best.

The unique features of Oral-B’s round brush head embrace and adapt to each tooth to deliver superior results on plaque and gum vs. a regular manual toothbrush.  The Oral-B round head and technology has been validated consistently by external and internal clinical research to deliver:

·         Superior plaque removal: Removes 2x more plaque vs. a regular manual toothbrush[iv]

·         Healthier gums: 36% reduction in gum bleeding sites vs. Sonicare[v] and 2x as effective at reducing gingivitis vs. a regular manual brushes[vi]

·         Preferred by patients: 66% preferred Oral-B vs. 31% for a sonic brush[vii]

 

An independent review of published research by the Cochrane Collaboration[viii] also confirmed the superiority and effectiveness of oscillating-rotating power technology over manual brushes, whilst recognizing its safety.

Help your patients brush their very best and achieve better gum and enamel health with Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste and an Oral-B electric rechargeable toothbrush.

 

Oral-B Partners with HPV Action to Improve the Lives of People in the UK

Oral-B strives to help consumers improve their oral health, an important part of overall health and wellness. Research shows that gum issues and particularly gingivitis affect 1 out of 2 adults worldwidei. Some studies also suggest poor gum health is associated with heart disease, diabetes and even premature birth[ix],[x].  As part of our effort to improve the overall health and wellbeing of consumers in the UK, Oral-B has partnered with HPV Action (HPVA), a collaborative partnership of 46 patient and professional organisations that are working to reduce the health burden of HPV, which is estimated to be the cause of 5% of all cancer cases[xi]. Oral-B will donate £5 for each completed Oral-B Gum & Enamel Repair Toothpaste dental patient evaluation programme.  All forms received by the end of October 2017 will qualify. Together with HPV Action we believe that we can make an important difference in the lives of consumers in the UK.

 

About Oral-B
Oral-B® is the worldwide leader in the over $5 billion brushing market. Part of the Procter & Gamble Company, the brand includes manual and electric toothbrushes for children and adults, oral irrigators and interdental products, such as dental floss. Oral-B® manual toothbrushes are used by more dentists than any other brand in the U.S. and many international markets.

References


[i] In a laboratory study on weakened enamel

[ii] Gerlach R and Amini P. Comp Cont Dent Educ 2012; 33 (2), 138-142

[iii] Against food acids vs. ordinary toothpastes

[iv] Compend Cont Educ Dent 2014; 25(9):702-706

[v] Oral-B Pro CrossAction vs Sonicare DiamondClean”,  J Clin Dent 2015; 26:80-85

[vi] J Dent Res (AADR/IADR) 2014;93 (Specs Iss A): Abstract 1366

[vii] Among 64 people participating in a clinical trial; P&G Data on file

[ix] Chapple IL, Genco R.  Working group 2 of the joint EFP/AAP workshop. Diabetes and periodontal diseases: consensus report of the Joint EFP/AAP Workshop on Periodontitis and Systemic Diseases. J Periodontal 2013; 84: S106-112 [PMID 23631572 DOI: 10.1902/jop.2013.1340011].

[x] Ide M, Papapanou PN. Epidemiology of association between maternal periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes – Systemic review. J Periodontal 2013; 84(suppl 4):S181-S194.

[xi] de Martel C, Ferlay J, Franceschi S, et al. Global burden of cancers attributable to infections in 2008: A review and synthetic analysis. Lancet Oncology 2012; 13(6):607-615.

 

 

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12282 Hits
MAR
30
0

Teeth Team Wins Inaugural BSPD Outstanding Innovation Award

Teeth Team Wins Inaugural BSPD Outstanding Innovation Award

 

 

 

The Association of Dental Groups (ADG) is delighted to announce that Teeth Team has been awarded the first ever Outstanding Innovation Award from the British Society of Paediatric Dentistry (BSPD). “On behalf of the Association, I would like to congratulate Teeth Team on winning such a prestigious accolade – it is richly deserved,” comments David Worskett, Chair of the ADG.

Teeth Team provides a supervised daily tooth brushing programme, annual dental assessments and bi-annual applications of fluoride varnish to a number of nursery and primary schools. Originally delivering its programme within the City of Hull and East Riding areas, Teeth Team has expanded into North Yorkshire, Nottingham North, South Humberside and parts of Lincolnshire, with plans to expand further with the help of its excellent support network and various partners.

“As ever, our aim is to continue to set up and provide oral health care to as many children in disadvantaged regions as we can,” says Chris Groombridge (pictured below), Teeth Team’s Chair of Trustees. “I’m hoping that in obtaining this award, of which we are thrilled to have won, we will be able to extend our reach further still and make a difference to even more young lives.”

 

Described as an ‘excellent project’ and ‘clear winner’ by the BSPD Executive judging team, Teeth Team is a fine example of what can be achieved when a proactive and practical approach is taken on ground level. “In the case of children’s oral health, it is absolutely essential to go straight to the source,” Chris continues, “For it is action that will have an impact on children, not words.”

In recognition of its achievement, Teeth Team has been invited to make a presentation about its exceptional work at the upcoming Annual Conference and Scientific Meeting in September. “It is an absolute honour and a privilege to be given the opportunity to speak at such a prestigious event,” says Chris. “We love nothing more than to spread the word about what the charity delivers – we would shout it from the rooftops if we could – so it will be a great experience for everyone involved in Teeth Team.”

On the presentation David Worskett adds: “We look forward to Teeth Team’s presentation at BSPD’s 2017 conference, and wish the charity all the best with their work moving forward.”

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk

  2204 Hits
2204 Hits
MAR
01
0

Daily care for implants

Daily care for implants

 

 

Many of your patients will have chosen implants to replace a missing tooth or teeth.

The stability of their implant will depend, in no small part, to the quality of self-care in between appointments.

Tandex has a range of brushes and other adjunctive products to answer all your implant patients’ needs. For example, the FLEXI™ is an interdental brush available in nine different sizes for complex implant spaces. The SOLO™ interspace brush will clean efficiently around critical points and give easy access around implants too. Used with a non-abrasive toothpaste, such as Tandex GEL, your patients will comfortably be able to remove the maximum amount of plaque and bacteria from all surfaces.

Proper cleaning will keep the implant stable and help avoid future complications, such as peri-implant mucositis, which can lead to peri-implantitis if left unchecked.

A simple routine performed twice a day will protect your patients’ investment. Recommend Tandex to your implant patients, so they can enjoy optimal oral health and implant stability for as long as possible.

For more information on Tandex’s range of products, 
visit www.tandex.dk or visit the facebook page:

Tandex Facebook

  2302 Hits
2302 Hits
JAN
10
0

The Role of Culture in Oral Health

The Role of Culture in Oral Health

 

 

The below blog has been written by Howard Thomas - Chairman at Curaprox 

When it comes to day-to-day life, culture plays a pivotal role in the behaviour and practices of communities – and oral health is no exception. Defined as learned behaviours that have been socially acquired and passed down from one generation to another, cultural practices can be affected by a number of factors including religion, race, ethnicity and geographical location.

In some countries, folk remedies and traditional methods are still used to treat and maintain oral health. It is well known, for instance, that some Somali people either use a stick collected from the branches of a tree called Roomay or a stick called Muswaki to clean their teeth instead of a toothbrush. The Chinese are also widely acknowledged for their deep-rooted culture and traditional practices, such as their use of powdered alum, musk and frankincense to treat what they call ‘hot’ gum disease.

Here in the UK, it is personal experience, education and the media that tend to sculpt cultural beliefs, values and practices. Television and print media in particular have played a pivotal role in the state of UK citizens’ oral health, not least because of the way that certain advertisements can reach a wide audience. Crisps, chocolate, sweets and sugary drinks – all of these products are widely publicised on a day-to-day basis. Plus, since culture is learned, shared and transmitted, the media has also contributed to the gradual desensitisation of poor dietary intake and the detrimental affects it can have on general and oral health.

Smoking and drinking are normal lifestyle choices too, and are some of the leading causes of oral health issues in the UK. Like other western, developed countries, some of these problems are as a result of the greater independence and freedom of choice that teenagers and young adults now have, not to mention the ease at which these substances can be accessed. It is also important to note the impact differences in social class can have upon oral health, from level of education to income and socio-economic status.

While it is likely that some cultures such as Somalia and China will hold on to their traditions, there is no denying that there is scope for future change, especially in the UK where society can be quite flexible and open to new things. Simply by changing cultural perspectives on dietary intake, lifestyle choices and encouraging patients to use effective adjuncts in a daily oral care regimen – such as CPS prime interdental brushes and the CS 5460 ultra soft toothbrush from Curaprox – communities could significantly improve behaviour and practices for future generations to come.

 

For more information please call 01480 862084, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit www.curaprox.co.uk

 

 
  2700 Hits
2700 Hits
NOV
01

Seasonal Stress Busters

Seasonal Stress Busters

 

 

The festive season seems to creep up on us every year. You may try to keep it low key, but it all takes up a lot of time, money and effort and often gives way to ‘seasonal stress.’ On the plus side, online shopping has provided a welcome reprieve from parking problems, trudging around crowded shops and standing in long queues. However, less than one in five people actually look forward to shopping for presents during the lead up to the festive season.[i] Added to this, is the worry of absorbing the extra expenditure - it is believed that most families will spend around £800, mostly on food and drink. There is also more pressure to overspend at this time of year and there is an increase in the proportion of people turning to credit to cover the cost of presents and food.[ii]

We all look forward to having the family together and eagerly waiting for everyone to arrive for the celebrations brings great joy. Nevertheless, some family gatherings can easily turn into an airing of grievances and there is always the worry that one relative could become awkward or drunk. These occasions can become exhausting and overwhelming, with festive cheer turning into festive fear for many people.

The pressure of Christmas can just be too much for some and the mental health charity Mind, states that one in four adults feel anxious about social gatherings during the festive period.[iii] It can be a tough time of year for everyone but if one feels under pressure to be sociable, to join in or to be on good form because everyone else seems to be enjoying themselves, social gatherings and parties can be uncomfortable and overpowering.

A lot of people suffer from low self-esteem or lack of confidence and chatting, dancing or getting up close to others is totally off limits for some individuals.

One of the reasons for this is that around 25 per cent of the entire population suffer from halitosis at some point in their lives[iv] and a great many others believe that they have it. In addition, to cope with the pressure directly associated with the festive season, there is a lot more alcohol and comfort food consumed. Some people even turn to smoking in their hours of need as insecurities become intensified. It is little wonder then that while stressed and tired, people might forget or skim over their normal oral health routines and end up with embarrassingly unpleasant smelling breath.

Nine out of ten cases of malodourous breath have an oral cause,[v] which is why dental professionals are ideally placed to help. When delivering instructions to improve oral hygiene levels, you can also recommend CB12 mouthwash to prevent unpleasant breath for up to 12 hours. Used each morning as a daily oral deodorant, this clinically proven formula is quick and easy to use - ideal during the busy holiday season. You could also encourage your patients to carry CB12 boost chewing gum - discreet mouth refreshment to power through any worrying breath inhibitions after meals and on the go.

 

Save your patients from ‘seasonal stress’ with sound advice and recommendations to bring little more cheer and good health to this time of year.

 

For more information about CB12 and how it could benefit your patients, please visit www.cb12.co.uk

 

 



[i] Ipsos MORI. Dealtime Christmas Shopping Survey. November 2000. https://ipsos-mori.com/researchpublications/researcharchive/poll.aspx?oItemId=1505 [Accessed 7th September 2016]

[ii] Money Advice Trust 2016. Borrowing up this Christmas, as one in four feel pressure to overspend. http://www.moneyadvicetrust.org/media/news/Pages/Borrowing-up-this-Christmas-as-one-in-four-feel-pressure-to-overspend.aspx [Accessed 7th September 2016]

[iii] Mind. Brits experiencing social anxiety at Christmas. December 2015. Poll conducted by Populus. http://www.mind.org.uk/news-campaigns/news/brits-experiencing-social-anxiety-at-christmas/#.V9AC32QrIlI [Accessed 7th September 2016]

[iv] Franziska Struch et al. Self-reported halitosis and gastro-esophageal reflux disease in the general population. J Gen Intern Med 23(3):260–6 DOI: 10.1007/s11606-007-0486-8 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2359469/pdf/11606_2007_Article_486.pdf [Accessed 7th September 2016]

[v] Andrea Zürcher, et al, Dept of Oral Surgery, University of Basel. 'Findings, Diagnoses and Results of a Halitosis Clinic over a Seven Year Period'. Schweiz Monatsschr Zahnmed. [Swiss Monthly Journal of Dentistry] 3/2012 Vol. 122 pp. 205-210 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22418723 [Accessed 7th September 2016]

 

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1915 Hits
SEP
01
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“38% of 12 year olds have signs of tooth wear.”*¹ You can help!

“38% of 12 year olds have signs of tooth wear.”*¹ You can help!

 

“38% of 12 year olds have signs of tooth wear.”*¹ You can help!

According to the Children’s Dental Health Survey 2013 “up to 57% of 5 year olds and up to 38% of 12 year olds have signs of tooth surface loss on the incisors.”*¹ Now that your young patients are going back to school, their lunchboxes may include acidic fruits, fruit juices and fizzy drinks which can lead to enamel softening and tooth wear. The enamel of their adult teeth has to last the rest of their life. And once enamel is gone it’s gone for good.

How can you protect your young patients’ enamel?  

Pronamel® for Children toothpaste has been developed with dental experts to help provide daily protection from the effects of erosive tooth wear and decay.

-          Optimised fluoride formulation with 1450 ppm fluoride to help re-harden acid-softened enamel

-          Low abrasivity to be gentle on softened enamel

-          Neutral pH and SLS free

The online CPD module, developed by GSK, gives you the opportunity to find out more about how to identify tooth wear using the BEWE tool. Simply visit www.gsk-dentalprofessionals.co.uk to complete the module today!

Pronamel® has worked with leading dental experts in the field of tooth wear to develop a range of products specifically designed to help protect against the effects of erosive tooth wear,2 such as Pronamel® for Children.

 

 

 

 

Recommend Pronamel® for Children to provide daily protection against erosive tooth wear and decay.

References:

  1. Children’s Dental Health Survey 2013. Report 2: Dental Disease and Damage in Children England, Wales and Northern Ireland. March 2015. Health & Social Care Information Centre.
  2. Final Minutes from the Expert Panel Meeting to Discuss Toothwear/Erosion

in Children. GSK Data on File. 2007

 

*Refers to the lingual surface of the incisor only

Trade Marks are owned by or licensed to the GSK group of companies.

CHGBI/CHPRO/0038/15c

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4626 Hits
AUG
25
0

Curaprox UK Expands into Ireland

Curaprox UK Expands into Ireland

 

Since it was established in 1972, Curaprox has become a leading name in oral health.

“As a team, we pride ourselves on offering proven solutions that encourage best practice, correct technique and ensure an efficacious oral hygiene regimen – and that is why we are delighted to be expanding our service to the Irish market with a new team member,” says Richard Thomas, MD of Curaprox UK.

“Though we have had a presence in Ireland since 2014 supplying our products via two renowned distributors, our goal has always been to expand Curaprox UK. That is why we have recruited Orla Sheehy to look after Curaprox Ireland as a Senior Business Development Manager.”

Orla is originally from Carlow, and has worked as an Operations Manager for a dental equipment company and for GSK.

Over the coming months Curaprox will be increasing its support to oral healthcare professionals across Ireland through regional meetings and by attending exhibitions.

Orla will also be working very closely with iTOP tutor Barbara Derham as part of Curaprox’s efforts to increase its educational presence.

In the meantime, Curaprox will continue to produce oral healthcare products that are safe, gentle and effective.

To find out more, contact Orla on 085 1644648 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

For more information please call 01480 862084, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit www.curaprox.co.uk

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2466 Hits
JUN
01
0

Genius by name, Genius by nature

Genius by name, Genius by nature

 

Last week saw the launch of the latest Oral-B toothbrush at the BDA Conference and I am pleased to see that they have gone even further down the path of the “internet of things” and improved their technology even further with the latest Genius brush.

Previously I wrote a blog in 2014 entitled “Dentistry embraces the Internet of Things”, when Oral-B launched their first brush connected to an app.

So 2 years on, the boffins at Oral-B have taken all the best features of the Bluetooth brush and made a number of considerable improvements.

  • The brush still works alongside the App. The app now tracks brushing habits and shows the user how to brush all zones in the mouth equally and evenly, which is a real game changer. No longer do you have an excuse of missing an area of your mouth.

  • The app has gamification, the user gets challenges to improve brushing habits.

  • Each users can partner with their dental professional through the Professional Guidance feature that provides customised care and a user can share data with their dental professional.

  • The app, also contains in-app entertainment, the app provides news, weather and oral care tips.

  • The brush comes with a stylish case, as well as a smartphone holder that fits to the user's bathroom mirror and lets the user know how they are doing via the app. The app is therefore straight ahead of the user’s eyeline.  

  • The lithium battery offers longer battery life and a lighter toothbrush!

  • The Triple Pressure Sensor technology protects gums from over aggressive brushing.

  • The brushes are now customisable with 12 colours available, except red which is used when the user applies too much pressure.

  • The user tells the app which hand you use to brush your teeth because they will then analyse the data accordingly and the app will understand why certain areas are missed.

 

All these clever features are an exciting way for you to help your patients improve their oral care and with some of the features you can even check what they are doing and which areas are being missed!

Further information about the brush can be found here - http://oralb.com/en-us/GENIUS

It is very exciting to see that dentistry has continued to embrace the internet of things and that toothbrushes are part of the connected home that we will see more and more over the next few years. This new brush is not only easy to use and lighter to hold, it also has a number of benefits that help improve our oral health…. Which is always a good thing.

The brush really is “Genius by name, Genius by nature”.

The Oral-B Genius will be available to the public from July.

  4118 Hits
4118 Hits
MAY
13
0

The inequality of children’s oral health demonstrates the need for greater effort to engender more preventative strategies, says Denplan

The inequality of children’s oral health demonstrates the need for greater effort to engender more preventative strategies, says Denplan

 

The current state of children’s oral health in the UK has once again been making the headlines this week.  Whilst Denplan welcomes the news from Public Health England that the number of five year olds with tooth decay has dropped to its lowest level in almost a decade, there is still much greater effort needed to install better prevention strategies in order to eradicate this entirely preventable dental disease in the child population.

Commenting on the PHE survey results, Henry Clover, Chief Dental Officer at Denplan said: “Although the figures show that the number of five year olds with tooth decay has dropped from 31% in 2008 down to less than 25%, this still represents a quarter of the country’s five years olds suffering from an entirely preventable disease. Focusing on comparing data to previous years is not that helpful and the government, working with the profession, must not shy away from seeking to tackle this problem head on. 

“The current NHS contract makes it more difficult for dentists to care for children with the worst dental health, a key factor in the need to reform the system introduced in 2006. Any new contract, must put prevention strategies at the forefront and recognise that good dental health in childhood is vital, not only for lifelong oral wellbeing, but for good overall health.

“Denplan believes that a dental health assessment should happen by the age of one to prevent early onset of disease. Denplan’s research conducted with YouGov revealed that only one in five parents of children aged 18 or under (19%) said they first took their child to the dentist before 12 months of age1.”

The PHE statistics also revealed that in some areas, such as the North West, a third of five year olds (33.4%) are suffering from tooth decay, compared to only a fifth (20.1%) in the South East.

“This inequality in children’s oral health demonstrates there is still a huge regional variation, with areas of higher levels of deprivation tending to have higher levels of tooth decay.  Investment must continue to be targeted to areas where access to dental services is low to improve provision and inequalities. The development of more multi-skilled dental teams could also help provide more effective and economical outcomes in helping treat children with more extensive oral health needs. Therapists, hygienists and dental nurses could also play a crucial role in this.”

Last but not least, Denplan believes there is still a lot of work to be done to engender more preventative behaviours amongst the public as a further report this week2 revealed that four in ten people fail to brush their teeth at least once a day.

Henry Clover concluded: “Dentists and their practice teams can also play their part by taking responsibility for improving oral health in their own communities by engaging with local authorities, schools, early years and other health services and helping to raise awareness of the links between oral health and overall health. The training of other health and care professionals such as midwives, school nurses, social workers and care home workers will also help ensure oral health messages are more widely disseminated, thereby helping to engender more preventive behaviours amongst the public.”

 

Sources:

Denplan/YouGov Survey. Total sample size was 5,152 adults. Fieldwork was undertaken between 11th-20th January 2016. The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted are representative of all UK adults (aged 18+).

http://www.which.co.uk/news/2016/05/40-dont-use-a-toothbrush-at-least-once-a-day-441471/ (Accessed on the 11th May 2016)

 

 

 

About Denplan

Denplan Limited is the UK’s leading dental payment plan specialist owned by Simplyhealth; with more than 6,500 member dentists nationwide caring for approximately 1.7 million customers. Established in 1986 by two dentists who pioneered the concept of dental payment plans, Denplan has been at the heart of dental care for nearly 30 years. Today, Denplan has a wide range of dental plans for adults and children, enabling patients to spread the cost of their private dental care through a fixed monthly fee. Denplan supports regular attendance and preventive care, reducing the need for clinical intervention and helping patients to maintain healthy teeth and gums for life. Patient enquiries telephone: 0800 401 402   Dentist enquiries telephone: 0800 328 3223         www.denplan.co.uk

·         Denplan Care: all routine and restorative care + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover

·         Denplan Essentials: routine care only + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover

·         Plans for Children: routine and other agreed care + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover

·         Membership Plan: registered with the dentist + worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover

·         Denplan Emergency: worldwide dental injury and dental emergency cover only

·         Corporate Dental Plans: company funded, voluntary and flexible benefit schemes

Denplan also provides a range of professional services for its member dentists and their practice teams, including the Denplan Quality Programme, Denplan Excel Certification Programme and Denplan Training.  Plus regulatory advice, business and marketing consultancy services and networking opportunities.

For more information about Denplan:

Rebecca Hutton

Denplan Press Office

Tel: 01962 829 179

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Follow us @denplandentists on Twitter and at linkedin.com/company/denplan-for-dentists

  6868 Hits
6868 Hits
MAR
07
0

Dentaid Needs Your Help!

Dentaid Needs Your Help!

 

 

 

 

TEXT TEETH TO 70660 TO DONATE £5

Plus your standard network rate

 

www.dentaid.org/get-involved/fundraise

  2596 Hits
2596 Hits
FEB
09

Oral Health Hazards for Hospital Patients

Oral Health Hazards for Hospital Patients

It has been known for centuries that dental health and systemic health are linked. However within the challenging environment of a hospital, oral care is still, quite often a low priority. Recent studies reveal that total bacterial count of dental plaque increases during hospitalisation[1] and the oral cavity of hospitalised patients can harbour high frequencies of bacterial respiratory pathogens.[2] As a result, this can lead to infections and hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP)2.
 

As well as inadequate oral hygiene, the potential risks to oral disease and discomfort in hospitalised patients include a significant number of medications as well as artificial feeding and high-calorie food supplements used to maintain nutrition. In addition, the effects of nasal oxygen, mouth breathing, intermittent suction of the airway and the restriction of oral food and fluid all contribute to a decrease in saliva production and symptoms such as xerostomia.[3]
 

Another common problem for sick patients is the dry mouth and discomfort caused by constant open mouth posture that is required for intubation. For those undergoing surgery, there can also be further complications. A study involving 404 surgical patients under general anaesthesia facilitated by endotracheal intubation, revealed that 6.9% sustained various degrees of oral trauma including soft tissue laceration, tooth fracture, prosthesis damage, tooth avulsion, ecchymosis and numbness of tongue.[4] In addition, a recently published study on the oral health of 162 patients found an increase in plaque levels and deterioration of gingival health during just a short stay in hospital.[5]
 

If a patient that has recently been hospitalised attends the dental practice, practitioners may observe oral tissue and tooth trauma, high plaque levels, gingivitis and periodontal disease. As always, it is fundamentally important to reinforce oral health instructions and to treat any dental problems efficiently. If, for example, periodontal disease has developed, it is first necessary to remove and disrupt the plaque using root surface debridement (RSD). In cases with deep periodontal pockets it is usually necessary to implement an adjunctive therapy to inhibit further periodontopathic bacterial growth and allow the periodontium time to heal and stabilise. Some practitioners use antibiotics for this purpose, but, if the patient has recently been unwell and had antibiotics prescribed previously, the risks of resistance are greater and it is preferable to use an antimicrobial alternative.
 

Practitioners should therefore consider PerioChip® – a wafer thin dental insert that is an effective, non-antibiotic alternative for treating periodontal pockets over 5mm. PerioChip® is applied directly into the periodontal pocket and slowly releases chlorhexidine digluconate to eliminate 99% of bacteria over 7-10 days.[6] Furthermore, the insert employs a controlled-release system and continues to provide an antibacterial effect to suppress bacterial growth for up to 11 weeks after placement.[7]

 

As it seems that care for medical and dental problems are still less coordinated than we might expect, it is imperative to emphasise to patients that successful recovery after a period of ill health or hospitalisation is not just about the body but also their oral health.

 

PerioChip® is available exclusively from Dexcel Dental, to order or for further information call 0800 013 2333 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 


[1] Sachdev MReady D, et al. Changes in dental plaque following hospitalisation in a critical care unit: an observational study. Crit Care. 2013 Sep 4;17(5):R189. doi: 10.1186/cc12878.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24007571 [Accessed 1st September 2015]

3 David ZuanazziaRenata Soutoa, et al. Prevalence of potential bacterial respiratory pathogens in the oral cavity of hospitalised individuals. Archives of Oral Biology Volume 55, Issue 1, January 2010. doi:10.1016/j.archoralbio.2009.10.005 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003996909002581 [Accessed 1st September 2015]

[3] Janet Griffiths and Debbie Lewis. Guidelines for the oral care of patients who are dependent, dysphagic or critically ill. Journal of Disability and Oral Health (2002) 3/1 30-33.  http://www.shancocksltd.co.uk/download.php?op=view_article&article_id=57 [Accessed 1st September 2015]

[4] Fung BKChan MY. Incidence of oral tissue trauma after the administration of general anesthesia. Acta Anaesthesiol Sin. 2001 Dec;39(4):163-7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11840582 [Accessed 1st September 2015

[5] Lucas L. A. Sousa, Wagner L. S. E. Silva Filho, et al. Oral health of patients under short hospitalization period: observational study. Journal of Clinical Periodontology 2014; 41: 558–563. doi:10.1111/jcpe.12250. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcpe.12250/abstract [Accessed 1st September 2015]

[6] Jeffcoat M K et al. Adjunctive use of a subgingival controlled-release chlorhexidine chip. J Periodontal 1998; 69 (9): 989 – 997. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9776027 [Accessed 1st September 2015]

 

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4041 Hits
FEB
09
0

Brush up on dental hygiene for National Toothache Day 2016

Brush up on dental hygiene for National Toothache Day 2016

 

 

Encourage your patients to prioritise their oral health with CB12 mouth rinse.

National Toothache Day is the perfect time to remind patients how important it is to look after their oral health. It serves as a prompt to book a dental check up, buy a new toothbrush, remember oral health instructions and remind them how to avoid painful toothaches.

Prevention is the key and by recommending CB12 mouth rinse as part of a daily oral health routine, you can empower patients with improved oral hygiene standards, fresh breath and confidence.

CB12 mouth rinse has been developed by dentists to provide confident breath for up to 12 hours by neutralising volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs). Its unique formula also contains fluoride to help strengthen the teeth and prevent cavities from developing.

You can grab your patients’ attention with the powerful effects of CB12 and encourage them spend a little more time looking after their teeth and gums - before any dental problems can occur.

See how your patients can benefit from a daily shot of CB12, by contacting the team today.

 

For more information about CB12 and how it could benefit your patients, please visit www.cb12.co.uk

  2649 Hits
2649 Hits
FEB
06
0

Critical Mass

Critical Mass

There is a concept in nuclear chemistry which many will be familiar with. Critical Mass has been adapted to apply almost any situation nowadays.   When a process of change is beginning, Critical Mass is used to refer to that point when change becomes inevitable.

What starts as a mood that change is needed becomes a minority activity with early adopters, eventually tipping over the edge for widespread general change for the better.

The bigger the system, the more one can see change with necessary Critical Mass at work on a daily basis

 

 

Early Years - has General Dental Practice failed?

 

Is “Early Years” dentistry about to undergo a change of massive significance? Is the state of children’s teeth [as it relates to caries and GA Admissions] about to trigger a political Critical Mass change

The problem of course is this:

£3billion of funding, give or take, by the Government, aims at funding dentists to sit there waiting for patients to wheel their little rug-rats in for a ‘check-up’.

Sadly, two facts suggest this time-honoured approach is a fail.

Firstly only 50% of the population actually go to the dentist, and that is without weighting the numbers towards any problems with new migrant or ethnic groups.

Secondly, by the time the child appears for their check-up age 3-4, the caries is already established, the dietary patterns are embedded and the Prevention horse has, by and large, well and truly bolted.

http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB17794/prov-mont-hes-admi-outp-ae-April 2014 to March 2015-toi-rep.xlsx  is a spreadsheet of child hospital treatment number suggesting in England alone some 110000 admissions for dental caries at about £670 per admission .

My back-of-my-vape-packet estimate is that some £73Million is spent [in England alone] with hospitals sorting out the fact that community prevention of dental disease in children has failed.  The medics have now woken up to the fact that this same diet is leading to an epidemic of child obesity and diabetes.

 

This pressure for change, smouldering for some time,  arguably gathered pace with the excellent planning document, Delivering better oral health: an evidence-based toolkit for prevention at

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/367563/DBOHv32014OCTMainDocument_3.pdf

Then we have the January 2015 Faculty of Dental Surgery issuing this report:

The state of children’s oral health in England at

https://www.rcseng.ac.uk/fds/policy/documents/fds-report-on-the-state-of-childrens-oral-health

 

 

GDPs do their best - but what is needed?

Patently dental teams who care for caries affected early-years-children do their best, often with imaginative and innovative outreach, but the numbers for GA Admissions suggest the problems fires are still raging despite the attempts to limit the spread by the profession from the GDP model.

 

Is the demand for planning of a different dental intervention for the first three years beginning to gather momentum? Are we indeed reaching a point where the energy and desire for change to be planned means that significant change will indeed become a priority?

Just look at the last year of public domain comment and criticism of the present status.

 

 

The Sugar-Obesity-Diabetes-Caries complex

 

Sugar is now being discussed in a widespread public debate about obesity [be it child or adult] and diabetes but led his time our medical colleagues. Caries is being discussed too.

Dentistry was the subject of an adjournment debate in the House of Commons this last week

Various media events [including the 3rd Daily Telegraph Letter] have taken place in which members of the profession have presented the view that the present system of delivery of dental care is simply failing to deliver any effective prevention to the early-years child.

It is also unclear if the new GDP Pilots will change much in the context of a developing problem and reducing financial resources in Government spending plan. It is clear the new CDO [NHSE] has sensed this and is trying to wind the initial changes back and see where the true problem lies an th evidence takes her.

 

Evidence?

Sadly, there is no real evidence, because we have a problem which requires action for which an integrated approach has never been trialled, let alone undertaken.

One example of the media attention is a recent BBC Look North slot with Dr Tony Kilcoyne.  The BDA it is reported are meeting with the Chief Medical Officer’s team.

Dentistry on its own is a small backwater of medical provision.

But when we start to get frequent interventions by the medical profession, increasing interest by the broadcast media, and an increasing public desire to understand and discuss the situation as it relates to THEIR dental health and that of their children,  … well anything can happen.

Now what happens to the GDP’s element of the  NHS Budget on the back of such changes is, of course, a separate discussion.

But can all this really happen? Will we really witness 2016 as the year that Critical Mass for real change will be reached.

 

 

Dentistry and Medicine united?

 

I suggest the need for a “National Early Years Preventive Strategy” will be crafted which integrates medicine and dental care into a program targeted at mothers and their children and wider families that will aim to influence the diet and dental care of the under 3’s.

We as a profession have arguing this case for years and the Department of Heath have merely sat by.

I sense the medical profession are not going to sit idly by and watch the sugar/obesity/diabetes/caries scanal  wreak further havoc, be it to personal heath or their budgets.

 

We can but hope. 

We can hope that as a profession we are included in the delivery of a  solution.

We can but hope that something better comes out of it for the wider work of Geneal Dental Practice.

  8537 Hits
8537 Hits
JAN
25
0

Humble heroes

Humble heroes

 

 

The Humble Smile Foundation, the excellent Humble Brush’s humanitarian partner, is extending its outreach by introducing the Humble Helpers Programme.

 

The aim of the Humble Helpers Programme is to help educate children on a number of interlinked topics, whilst providing a platform to raise much-needed funds for charitable endeavours all over the world. These funds will come straight from the profits of each Humble Brush sale – and will help make a real difference to those less fortunate!

 

As the Humble Smile Foundation will donate the same number of dental health adjuncts for every Humble Brush sold by its Humble Helpers, the effects of the programme will be felt far and wide.

 

Split into four interconnected modules, Charity, Oral Health, Healthy Eating and the Environment, the programme introduces the fundamental principle of the Humble Smile Foundation: how helping others can have a positive impact on the lives of everyone – not just in their own communities, but right across the globe. 

 

Participating schools will be supplied with all the necessary educational and promotional materials to help their appointed Humble Hero deliver the message to children. With their help, more people will have a reason to smile!

 

To find out more about the Humble Smile Foundation’s amazing work – and the popular Humble Brush – contact the team today!

 

Humble Brush is now available in the UK and Ireland. For more information please visit www.humblebrush.co.uk, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 0286 862 8880.

To order please contact the exclusive distributor Quintess Denta www.quintesshumblebrush.co.uk

 

Follow us on social media:

@HumbleBrush and www.facebook.com/humblebrushuk

  2822 Hits
2822 Hits
DEC
02

12 top tips for the 12 days of Christmas

 

12 top tips for the 12 days of Christmas

According to charity Addaction, 54% of men and 41% of women are expected to drink over the recommended guidelines at Christmas, and so it is important to raise our patients’ awareness of the increased potential for tooth damage at this time of year.

As we dental professionals know all too well, alcohol is acidic and therefore highly erosive, especially when consumed frequently, in large quantities over an extended period of time. It may also be that the high alcohol intake occasionally causes vomiting, which can exacerbate the damage to the dentition.

To help prevent tooth wear, advise patients to:

1. Drink still water or low fat milk between meals

2. Limit fruit juice to once per day

3. Avoid carbonated drinks

4. Swallow any acidic drinks immediately to reduce contact time with the teeth

5. Use a wide-bore straw to drink acidic drinks to limit the contact time with the teeth

6. Dilute and keep any acidic drinks chilled, as this reduces the damaging low pH potential

7. Rinse the mouth after acidic foods and drinks with water for 15-30 seconds to dilute any remaining acids

8. Snack on cheese or drink some milk following consumption of an acidic beverage

9. Wait at least an hour to brush teeth after consuming any acidic drinks

10. Use a toothpaste that is fluoridated to 1400ppm and low in abrasivity

12. Use a fluoridated mouthwash every day at a different time to tooth brushing, as well as before or after acidic drinks to help limit the erosive potential

12. Chew sugar-free gum, especially that containing xylitol, after drink to help neutralise the acidic environment in the mouth.

 

If you are concerned that any of your patients are showing signs tooth wear, simply visit www.toothwear.co.uk, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 020 7486 7180.

 

  2835 Hits
2835 Hits
NOV
26

Preventive and protective - 3M Espe

Preventive and protective - 3M Espe

Adopting preventive measures in your practice is essential to help patients achieve optimum oral health. Fissure sealants can be particularly beneficial, especially in young children who require extra protection against caries.[i]

 

Clinpro Fissure Sealant from 3M ESPE can provide this vital protection[ii] while offering you a convenient direct delivery syringe for simple application. Not only that, the low viscosity allows it to flow easily into pits and fissures.

 

Clinpro Fissure sealant also utilises  colour change technology to allow for easy placement.[iii] Clinpro Fissure sealant isPink when applied and changes to an opaque white once exposed to light, leaving a layor of invisible protection.

 

For a truly preventive and protective solution try Clinpro Fissure Sealant from 3M ESPE today.

 

For more information, call 0845 602 5094 or visit www.3Mespe.co.uk



[i] Weintraub, J (2001). Pit and Fissure Sealants in High Caries Risk Individuals. Journal of Dental Education. 65(10). p.84-90

[ii] 3M ESPE Internal Data. Caries Protectionm, 2011. Claim Number 4792

[iii] 3M ESPE Internal Data. First sealant with smart colour-change technology, 2001. Claim number 1297

 

  2563 Hits
2563 Hits
NOV
15

Crossing the Interdental Divide - Wisdom

Crossing the Interdental Divide

The Wisdom Clean Between Interdental Brushes are clinically proven[i],[ii] to help your patients safely and gently remove plaque and maintain optimum dental health.

 

Dental flossing can be an unpopular oral health adjunct for many patients and the Wisdom Clean Between Interdental Brushes offer an effective alternative to both floss and wire interdental brushes.

 

Constructed with latex-free, rubber filaments, they are wire-free and easy to use between tight spaces in natural teeth, under bridges, around dental implants and with fixed orthodontic appliances.

 

The soft tips gently stimulate and massage the gingiva, minimising trauma and helping to prevent galvanic effect.

 

From September, a Dentist Surgery Pack of Wisdom Clean Between Interdental Brushes will be available via dental wholesalers for you to use on patients. Consisting of a dispenser box with 100 cello-wrapped bundles of each colour of brush, these will provide the ideal opportunity to introduce the products to patients, showing how their oral health can be maintained with ease.

 

Whatever the dentition, Wisdom Clean Between Interdental Brushes provide a solution. Find out more today.

 

To find out more, please visit www.wisdomtoothbrushes.com or

call 01440 714800

 



[i] Yost et el, Interproximal gingivitis and plaque reduction by four interdental products. J Clin Dent. 2006;17(3):79-83.

[ii] Prof. Dr. Petra Ratka-Kru?ger et al, Clinical trial of a metal-free interdental brush. University Medical Centre Freiburg, Germany. Pub Nov 2010.

 

 

  2469 Hits
2469 Hits
NOV
15

Take Action Against Oral Cancer - Association of Dental Groups

Take Action Against Oral Cancer - Association of Dental Groups

Brought to you by the British Dental Health Foundation and supported by the Association of Dental Groups (ADG), the Mouth Cancer Action Month campaign is this month, aiming to raise further awareness and rally more support than ever before.
 

“As long term supporters of the British Dental Health Foundation and Mouth Cancer Action Month, we are as pleased as ever to be able to contribute to such a worthy cause,” says Chair of the ADG, David Worskett. “By working together we can tackle oral cancer and make a real difference to those who suffer, one campaign at a time.”

Diagnosis

With the latest figures showing that 6,767 people are diagnosed with mouth cancer in the UK each year,[i] educating and alerting people on the dangers of oral cancer remains crucial for ensuring early diagnosis and treatment.

As it stands, a referral to a specialist must be completed within a two-week time frame,[ii] and there is a one-month maximum wait from the date a decision to treat is made to the first definitive treatment.[iii] For survival rates to increase, delivery of these treatment pathways by NHS England must continue to be implemented and improved upon.

As Chief Executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter OBE explains, “if more of us are aware of the potential dangers of long-lasting mouth ulcers, red and white patches and unusual lumps or swellings in the mouth, there could well be a reduction in the number of mouth cancer cases we are seeing.”

Do Your Bit

Unfortunately however, a lack of patient knowledge is evident, with statistics showing that only 40% of patients who develop oral cancer visit the dentist with concerns.[iv]. As Dr Nigel Carter OBE explains, “If the dental and wider health profession can inform and urge patients to regularly attend dental check-ups, we can increase the chances of mouth cancer being detected at an early stage.” That is why Mouth Cancer Action Month continues its efforts to inform and educate and why it urges you to incorporate regular screening for oral cancer into routine appointments.

Meanwhile, the British Dental Health Foundation will continue to provide educational materials to dental practices, hospitals, GPs and pharmacies, and remains passionate about improving the awareness of patients and professionals alike. Whether it’s through donning a blue ribbon, taking part in the Blue Lip Selfie Campaign, running an event or donating, you can give back to the cause and to your patients. Remember, all the support received really does make a difference to the charity and to the lives of the individuals who have suffered at the hands of oral cancer.

 

To donate or for more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk

 

 



[i] Facts and Figures. Mouth Cancer Action Month. Accessed online August 2015. http://www.mouthcancer.org/facts-figures/

[ii] Your right: urgent two-week referral. The NHS Constitution. Accessed online July 2015. file:///Users/officeone/Downloads/Your%20right%20urgent%20two-week%20referral.pdf

[iii] Delivery Cancer Waiting Times: A Good Practice Guide. Accessed online July 2015. www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/delivering-cancer-wait-times.pdf

[iv] Hollows P, McAndrew P G, Perini M G. Delays in the referral and treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Br Dent J 2000; 188: 262–265. Accessed online July 2015. www.nature.com/bdj/journal/v188/n5/full/4800449a.html

 

  2242 Hits
2242 Hits
NOV
05

Periodontal disease: more than an oral health concern

Periodontal disease: more than an oral health concern

Described as a global burden, severe periodontitis has been reported to be the sixth most prevalent medical condition in the world.[1]

 

In the UK, periodontitis affects about half of all adults with up to 15% estimated to have the condition severely.[2] These shocking statistics echo the findings of the 2009 Adult Dental Health Survey, which reported that, although this generation has a better outlook than their predecessors, there are still many people whose oral health and function does not meet the best possible standards.[3]

 

Periodontal disease is a particular area of concern because it can cause serious oral health problems and when left untreated, and can result in tooth loss as well as deterioration of both gingiva and bone. Ominously the potential effects and implications of periodontal disease may also extend beyond oral health and recent research has established that periodontal infection is a probable risk factor for various systemic diseases, including pulmonary disease.[4]

 

Furthermore, periodontal disease has the capability of changing the chemical composition of the blood and glucose levels as well as interfering with the body's inflammatory system and thereby increasing the risk of diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis,[5] respiratory[6] and cardiovascular diseases.[7],[8]

 

As we know, tobacco use, stress and obesity may be significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease. However people with other general health conditions also have an increased risk of developing the condition. Evidence has consistently revealed that diabetes is a risk factor for the prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis[9] and a five-year follow-up, population-based study in Taiwan[10] has also indicated that patients with osteoporosis might have an increased chance of developing periodontitis.

 

Over the last few decades the concept of a genetic vulnerability to periodontal disease has also been investigated.[1] Since the completion of the Human Genome Project (HGP)[2], researchers have found evidence to suggest that a key element of whether individuals develop periodontitis appears to be controlled by the way they interact with environmental agents including biofilm. These researchers also believe that periodontal disease could be categorised more effectively using pathobiology-based grouping as well as the clinical presentation of the disease, rather than the current clinical only classifications of ‘chronic’ and ‘aggressive’.[3]

 

A new system for categorising periodontitis based on the molecular profiling of gingival tissues has therefore been devised, which could enable earlier diagnosis and more personalised treatment. It is hoped that patients found to be highly susceptible to severe periodontitis may be considered for assertive therapy even if that person only show indicators. This would then prevent aggressive progression, bone and tooth loss.

 

Helping patients to understand the threat of periodontal disease not only with regard to oral health but also in relation to other potential health risks is vital. Of course treatment for periodontal disease depends upon each individual case, but every patient must appreciate the importance of practicing good oral hygiene. Employing an improved oral health care regime may be enough to kerb further development of the disease in some patients, although professional scaling and debridement is commonly required to remove plaque, calculus and biofilm from the teeth and roots.

 

For some patients it is necessary to include on-going periodontal therapy with medication to keep infection under control and to heal periodontal pockets. Nevertheless, in aggressive cases it may be necessary to perform flap surgery to clean the area thoroughly and suture periodontal pockets. Some of these patients may also require bone grafting to promote new growth or tissue regeneration to cover any exposed tooth roots.

 

In many cases a general dentist, therapist or hygienist can treat patients with periodontal disease successfully. However, in complex or unresponsive cases the skills of a specialist periodontist may be needed. By creating a good working relationship with a reliable referral practice, such as London Smile Clinic, your patients can benefit from specialist clinical skills in a wide spectrum of dentistry. With a wealth of experience in oral and maxillo-facial surgery, Dr. Hatem Algraffee, specialist periodontist at London Smile Clinic

 


[1] N.J. Kassebaum, E. Bernabé, M. Dahiya, B. Bhandari, C.J.L. Murray, W. Marcenes.  Global Burden of Untreated Caries: A Systematic Review and Metaregression J DENT RES, May 2015; vol. 94, 5: pp. 650-658, first published on March 4, 2015

[3] 2009 Adult Dental Health Survey (ADHS) http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB01086/adul-dent-heal-surv-summ-them-exec-2009-rep2.pdf

[4] Scannapieco FA, Papandonatos GD, Dunford RG. Associations between oral conditions and respiratory disease in a national sample survey population. Ann Periodontol 1998;3:251-256.

[5] American Academy of Periodontology. http://www.perio.org/consumer/risk-factors

[6] Association between respiratory disease in hospitalized patients and periodontal disease: a cross-sectional study. Sharma, N., Shamsuddin, H. J. Periodontol. August 2011. pp1155-1160. Available at: http://www.pharmaden.net/pdf/articles/2.pdf

[7] Machado AC, Quirino MR, Nascimento LF. Relation between chronic periodontal disease and plasmatic levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and fractions. Brazilian oral research, 2005, 19(4):284–9.

[8] Genco RJ et al. Overview of risk factors for periodontal disease and implications for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Compendium of continuing education in dentistry, 2001, 22(2 Spec. No.):21–3.

[9] Mealey BL, Oates TW. Diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases. J Periodontol. 2006;77:1289-1303.

[10] Population-Based 5-Year Follow-Up Study in Taiwan of Osteoporosis and Risk of Periodontitis
Wei-Pin Chang, Wei-Chiao Chang, Mei-Shin Wu, Jei-Tsung Pai, Yuh-Cherng Guo Ku-Chung Chen, Mu-En Liu, Wen-Ta Chiu, and Kuo-Sheng Hung

4 Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. Informational paper: implications of genetic technology for the management of periodontal diseases. J Periodontol. 2005 May;76(5):850-7.   

5 Schafer AS, Jepsen S, Loos BG. Periodontal genetics: a decade of genetic association studies mandates better study designs. J Clin Periodontol. 2011 Feb;38(2):103-7.

[2] National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), National Institute of Health US. www.genome.gov

[3] Gingival Tissue Transcriptomes Identify Phenotypically Distinct Classes of Periodontitis. Panos N, Papapanou M, Kebschull R.T, Demmer B, Grün  P, Guarnieri P, Pavlidis P (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada) March 2014. http://jdr.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/03/17/0022034514527288  [Accessed 25th March 2015] 

 

  3409 Hits
3409 Hits
NOV
02

Teenage dream - CB12

Teenage dream

The state of the nation’s children’s dental health never seems far from the headlines. Although the NHS insists there has been a vast improvement over the past decade, the fact that nearly 26,000 five-to-nine year olds were admitted to hospital for tooth decay in England in 2013-14[i], means the time for action is now. But a focused, multi-agency approach, based on education and prevention, must consider how a child’s needs change as they grow older and move into adolescence.

Just like other life stages, hormones play a significant part, making a good oral health routine crucial. Research has shown that puberty’s rush of ‘sex hormones’ affects the periodontium.[ii] This is an unavoidable factor; as for an ‘avoidable’ one, a smoking habit usually starts, and gets established, during adolescence, and obviously has many serious consequences for dental and systemic health.

Like smoking, eating disorders are often initiated during the teenage years. Individuals who develop bulimia nervosa may experience acid erosion to the surface of the teeth as a result of vomiting. Anorexia nervosa can lead to increased caries, xerostomia and osteoporosis due to a lack of essential nutrients.

Energy drinks are popular during examination time as they are marketed as boosting energy, decreasing fatigue and enhancing concentration. However, they are often full of sugar, too. Skipping breakfast – or grabbing something unhealthy on-the-go – is also common. New research has shown that teens are twice as likely to suffer from halitosis if they miss breakfast[iii] and, with these years being a defining time socially, bad breath can be a great motivational tool to trigger better oral care!

With finances also likely to be an issue we need to look at simple, cost-effective ways to boost teens’ dental health between appointments. Education about the causes of halitosis, proper brushing techniques and the dangers of smoking of course are important, but they could add some adjunctive products, too, such as CB12 mouth rinse and Boost chewing gum which are clinically proven to neutralise the gases that cause halitosis and keep the the mouth fresh all day.  

With such a drive to improve children’s dental health, we much not forget what comes after. Late adolescence is full of social, psychological and financial pressures and regular trips to the dentist are unlikely to be a priority, especially if an individual has just left home for the first time. The best solutions are always the simple ones, and no one wants to be known as the person with bad teeth or breath! Guidance and support is not just for kids, and will provide life-long benefits.

 

For more information on CB12 and the extensive research behind it, please visit www.cb12.co.uk

 



[i] Child tooth removal ‘at crisis point’, doctors warn. BBC Health News, 12 July 2015. Found at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-33498324 (accessed 15 July 2015)

[ii] Apoorva, S. M., and A. Suchetha. "Effect of sex hormones on periodontium."Indian J. Dent. Sci 2 (2010): 36-40.

[iii] RANI H et al (2015) ‘Oral malodour among adolescents and its association with health behaviour and oral health status’, International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 2015

 

  2901 Hits
2901 Hits
NOV
02

We Share Because We Care

We Share Because We Care

Working with the British Dental Health Foundation, the Association of Dental Groups (ADG) continues to pledge its support to Mouth Cancer Action Month in November and it’s mission to promote understanding of oral cancer.

 

With over 40 years of experience, the British Dental Health Foundation has dedicated its time to educating, imparting advice and running crucial campaigns, with its messages reaching 560 million people.

 

Together, the ADG and British Dental Health Foundation continue raising awareness of the early signs and symptoms of oral cancer and encouraging regular dental check ups. By increasing the chance of early diagnosis, morbidity rates and the devastating effects of oral cancer can be minimised.

 

Through the Blue Ribbon Appeal and by taking part in Blue Wednesdays and the Blue Lip Selfie Campaign, you can show your support to the cause.

 

Get involved and help change tomorrow’s statistics, today.

 

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk

 

 

  2309 Hits
2309 Hits
OCT
30

November, A month To Remember - David Worskett Chairman, Association of Dental Groups

November A month To Remember - David Worskett Chairman Association of Dental Groups

As the Association of Dental Groups (ADG) continues to promote prevention of dental health problems and delivery of quality outcomes for patients in a sustainable, high quality manner, Mouth Cancer Action Month remains of utmost importance.

“As long term supporters of the British Dental Health Foundation and Mouth Cancer Action Month, we are as pleased as ever to be able to contribute to such a worthy cause,” comments Chair of the ADG, David Worskett. “By working together we can tackle oral cancer and make a real difference to those who suffer, one campaign at a time.”

Indeed, now that Mouth Cancer Action Month is underway – as launched by the British Dental Health Foundation on the 29th of October at the House of Commons – the ADG will once again resume its task of raising awareness on diagnosis and prevention.

Currently, statistics show that only 40% of patients who develop mouth cancer visit the dentist with concerns. [i] But as Chief Executive of the British Dental Health Foundation Dr Nigel Carter OBE explains, “if the dental and wider health profession can inform and urge patients to regularly attend dental check-ups, we can increase the chances of mouth cancer being detected at an early stage.”

If any headway is to be made, these wise words must be implemented. Indeed, with the latest figures showing that 6,767[ii] people are diagnosed with mouth cancer in the UK each year, it is important that as many people as possible get involved with Mouth Cancer Action Month.

Whether it’s the Blue Lip Selfie Campaign – where all you need to do is take a selfie of yourself and share it with the hashtag #bluelipselfie – or showing your support by wearing a blue ribbon badge, your participation is crucial to the success of the campaign.

Another useful tool available is the oral cancer CPD module available through the ADG, designed by {my}dentist. While it may not be mandatory, recapping on areas such as early symptoms, referral and treatment pathways for the disease and improving patient awareness could be the difference between saving and losing a life.

That is why the ADG is pleased to announce the return of the CPD module, and hopes that the tool will help in the battle against mouth cancer. The module is free to review, with only a small cost of £25 plus VAT – £5 of which will be donated to the British Dental Health Foundation and the Mouth Cancer Action Month campaign – for those wishing to apply for a CPD certificate.

Ultimately, the campaign needs all the help and support it can get, especially as research indicates that early detection of mouth cancer can result in a survival outcome of 90%.[iii]

 

For more information on Mouth Cancer Action Month, the CPD module and to find out how you can be a part of the month long November campaign, contact the ADG today.

 

 

For more information about the ADG visit www.dentalgroups.co.uk.

 



[i] Hollows P, McAndrew P G, Perini M G. Delays in the referral and treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Br Dent J 2000; 188: 262–265. Accessed online July 2015. www.nature.com/bdj/journal/v188/n5/full/4800449a.html

[ii] Facts and Figures. Mouth Cancer Action Month. Accessed online August 2015. http://www.mouthcancer.org/facts-figures/

[iii] Facts and figures. Mouth Cancer Action Month. Accessed online October 2015 http://www.mouthcancer.org/facts-figures/

 

  2682 Hits
2682 Hits
OCT
14
0

HPV Vaccinations - Make Some Noise for the Boys!

 

 

Squamous papilloma -- very low mag.jpg
"Squamous papilloma -- very low mag" by Nephron - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons.

Continue reading
  5760 Hits
5760 Hits
JUL
19

A world record to remember

A world record to remember

There are already a number of world records that have been set in the dental sector. From the most people brushing their teeth together in one place (an astonishing 13,380 in total), to an elephant who received the largest ever dental caps (held in place with more dental adhesive than was used in the whole of Canada in a year!), to a vast array of individuals who have lifted and pulled inadvisably heavy objects with their teeth.

 

But as remarkable as these examples are, it is doubtful they will have a lasting, positive impact on the profession. That is why what happened in Târgu Mure?, Romania on May 16th of this year is so important. At around 2 o’clock in the afternoon, over 1,500 people gathered in a municipal park and partook in the largest oral hygiene lesson in the world. Admittedly, the sixteenth largest city in Romania may seem like a somewhat innocuous setting for such an event to take place – but what it achieved was an incredibly encouraging step in the right direction in terms of raising awareness for the importance of effective oral healthcare.

As we are all aware, one of the biggest challenges faced by dental professionals today is the lack of understanding and effective education amongst patients, especially children. This makes both treatment in the practice and preventative homecare more difficult to achieve.

But by making oral health education fun and different, it may be possible to eliminate this difficulty altogether. Encouraging people to take part in something like a world record can be incredibly motivating. The chances are that they will be able to take away not only memories of an enjoyable day, but some useful information that will benefit them and their oral health in the future as well.

That is why the lesson in Târgu Mure? was such an effective one – and marked a significant attempt to help people understand the importance of maintaining their own oral health. Participants were led by Dr Ana Stevanovic for 30 minutes of brushing, flossing and learning all about the best methods of keeping teeth clean and healthy, with high-quality, everyday products that make doing so simple.

The event was proudly supported by leading oral hygiene expert, Curaprox. By providing participants with oral health care kits containing a number of its own excellent products, Curaprox showed its passion for providing patients with the tools and knowledge to improve their oral health.

The onus is now on UK dental professionals to replicate the success of the innovative Romanian oral hygiene event in an attempt to improve oral health in this country – perhaps then it won’t be long before the record set in Târgu Mure? will be broken, here in the UK.  

 

For more information please call 01480 862084, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
or visit www.curaprox.co.uk

 

  2449 Hits
2449 Hits
JUL
14

Breaking world records with a smile

Curaprox-News.jpg

Not only is leading oral hygiene expert, Curaprox, providing high-quality adjunctive products for everyday use, it’s also helping break world records.

In a municipal park in Târgu Mures?, Romania, over 1,500 people gathered together on a Saturday in May. They hadn’t come for some kind of rally or protest or musical event – they’d come to learn more about better oral hygiene.

The previous record for the largest oral hygiene lesson in a single venue was set in Cairo last March, with just under 1,200 people in attendance.

That record has now been broken.

With oral health kits provided by Curaprox, containing a number of useful products, participants were led through 30 minutes of brushing, flossing and learning about proper oral health care – earning them a Guinness World Record at the end.

A fun and memorable afternoon for everyone involved, this event also marked an important milestone in oral health education that the whole team at Curaprox was proud to be able to support.

 

For more information please call 01480 862084, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
or visit www.curaprox.co.uk

 

  2006 Hits
2006 Hits
JUN
01
0

Do your patients know that alcohol and oral health don’t mix?

London Tooth Wear Centre - Dental Health and Alcohol

With barbecues getting stoked up for summer, it may be a good time to help raise awareness among patients that their alcoholic drink of choice accompanying their chargrilled chicken may contribute to tooth wear.

Patients need to know that alcohol is acidic and therefore highly erosive, especially when consumed frequently, in large quantities over an extended period of time. It may also be that the high alcohol intake occasionally causes vomiting, which will exacerbate the damage to the dentition.

It’s also worth sharing with them that carbonated drinks, including sugar-free varieties, will have a similar effect on their dentition.

As well as coronal height being reduced, patients may also suffer with hypersensitivity due to the wear. In such cases, using a fluoridated mouthrinse every day at a different time to toothbrushing is an effective first line of defence. A desensitising toothpaste and/or prescription fluoride toothpaste can be helpful in alleviating sensitivity, while use of a calcium phosphate paste, applied in carriers, is an additional option if the symptoms are severe. Also, placing protective covering restorations can eliminate sensitivity and minimise further wear.

Further advice includes:

• Guiding the patient in brushing effectively yet gently with a relatively soft toothbrush and a toothpaste low in abrasivity

• Not swishing drinks around the mouth and waiting an hour after consuming an acidic drink before brushing to avoid damaging the softened enamel

• Rinsing the mouth with fluoride mouthwash or water before or after acidic drink consumption to help limit their erosive potential

• Chewing sugar-free, xylitol- or sorbitol-sweetened gum to help neutralise acid in the mouth.

 

The London Tooth Wear Centre® offers an evidence-based and comprehensive approach to managing tooth wear. To request advice, make a referral or for further information on the work of the London Tooth Wear Centre®, please visit www.toothwear.co.uk, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 020 7486 7180.

 

  3222 Hits
3222 Hits
MAY
02
0

Oral Health Product Review

Oral Health Product Review

  4387 Hits
4387 Hits
APR
19
0

Don't make a meal of it

Don't make a meal of it

  4512 Hits
4512 Hits
MAR
02
0

Gummies for Dummies

Gummies for Dummies

  3824 Hits
3824 Hits
NOV
21
0

The Tooth Trip

The Tooth Trip

I was surprised to see the advice we give our patients has not changed much in over 40 years! I am reading a book called “The Tooth Trip” that was written by dentist Thomas McGuire in 1972; he describes the same prevention based dentistry we practice today. This book was written for the public to understand oral diseases and their role in preventing it.

Some of the book is way off the mark with recipes for making homemade toothpaste with Sage, Myrrh and powdered roots. Making toothbrushes from twigs and sticks does not sound like the best use of an hour of your time. What resonated so strongly with me was the descriptions of self-examination of your mouth and emphasis on prevention and working together with your dentist. A whole chapter was on dental emergencies and what constitutes a real emergency- severe or recurrent bleeding or severe pain not relived by painkillers. Just getting your patients to read this chapter alone would save thousands of wasted dental appointments. There was sensible honest advice on how and why teeth can hurt and how you can prevent it and work together with your dental team to stop it recurring.

In our modern age, if we educate our patients in the causes of dental disease and how it is entirely preventable, they too could have healthy mouths and lower dental bills. Despite the fact that most of this information is freely available on the internet or in the leaflets that some dental practices give out, not much has changed. Why is that?

I feel that until the information is specifically tailored to our patents and they can see the benefit from following that specific advice, they will switch off. If you promote the fact that you fix teeth, they will just come and expect you to fix them. This is where modern dental teams come in. We need to genuinely listen to our patients, do not interrupt them, let them get their whole story out. Examine their mouth, show them the evidence of disease in a clear and non-judgemental way. Explain their options and how as a team, you can return their mouth to health. Make them understand that without them, all your treatment will fail. Spending extra time now will save hours of treatment in the future and help educate a generation that loves going to the dentist. All good dentists want their work to be appreciated and to last a life-time.

Four Dental sins from the 1970’s that Dentists still do to this day:

1. Leaflet avoidance. Handing your patients reading matter to explain your treatment and asking them to go home to go through it. Nothing beats a face to face discussion where you allow them time to discuss their personal fears and questions. Leaflets should be only a back-up once the conversation has taken place.

2. Technical jargon. Using dental terminology or complex words to explain your diagnosis and treatment. All professions have jargon. The skilled dentists explain it in a language that that specific patient will understand.

3. Carrying out treatment whilst discussing the patient’s options. No-one can fully concentrate when lying on their back with theirs mouth open or having treatment carried out. Stop, sit the patient up and have a face to face conversation.

4. Bulldozing. Talking it through you your patient until they are worn down and just say yes. Nothing is life or death that you need to decide there and then. Place a temporary filling and then explain the options; pros, cons and cost. Then let them go away and think about it.

 

How are you going to make the most of your patients next tooth trip?

 

Photo by Jenn Durfey, licence info

 

 

James Goolnik is a practising Dentist and his book “Brush” donates 100% of the profits to Dentaid. He recently led a team of 8 dental professionals to Malawi to install two dental chairs, equipment and deliver skills transfer workshops from these proceeds. He is a trustee of the charity “Heart your Smile”.

 

www.jamesgoolnik.com


 

  19583 Hits
19583 Hits

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